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Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 1

Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 1

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 1

Biotech Health and Life Products Company Profile

Welcome to Biotech! The assessment projects for this class will examine different facets of the leadership of Biotech Health and Life Products, Inc. You will be exploring leadership within Biotech with the driving question of “what skills does a Biotech leader need to lead the company now and in the future?”

History Wilford Barney was a young apprentice working for Peter Ulan, owner of a small apothecary shop in Yonkers, New York. During his apprenticeship, Barney created a general energy elixir that was based on a home remedy of his mother’s back in Ireland. The elixir was produced specifically for many of Ulan’s special customers. Made of all natural ingredients the elixir provided B12 and other vitamins to promote a healthy immune system. The energy boost was noticeable after only a week’s use. The reputation of the elixir grew.

In 1922, Barney took over Ulan’s apothecary shop renaming the business, Barney’s Apothecary. At that time, Barney decided to bottle his elixir and sell the formula to everyone rather than selected customers. Barney also gave bottles of the elixir to local peddlers who sold the product along with their wares receiving a commission on each bottle they sold. By 1929, the product was well known in Yonkers. Encouraged by the success in Yonkers Barney decided to branch out to New York City.

In 1932, Barney built a small manufacturing plant near the store where he mixed and bottled the elixir for sale. By 1934, Barney expanded sales by putting the elixir in a quarter of the apothecary shops in New York City. Sales were booming and customers inquired about other products that Barney’s had.

In 1936, Barney started a new product called Night Relief, another of his mother’s recipes. This product offered relief from night sweats and anxiety caused by menopausal symptoms or nerves. When this product proved a “secret success” with the ladies, Barney decided to bring his mother, Irene, from Ireland, and put her to work making new natural products. With his mother’s help, Barney grew the business into a small but successful manufacturer of natural “life products”. Barney coined “life products” because the products tracked natural life events in the human body and attempted to improve the customer’s discomfort in dealing with them.

The name of the company was changed to Barney’s Elixir and Life Products. The business continued to grow and with his mother’s death in 1938 the company had a gross revenue of $178,000 a year. The depression took a toll on company profits

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 2

but people still needed the boosts to their health and were able to afford Barney’s products as opposed to the medicine offered by doctors and hospitals. During World War II the company supplied the troops with a natural caffeine (Stay Clear) product that would keep soldiers awake for long periods of time and heighten their mental alertness. Government contracts derived from Stay Clear boosted the revenue of the company considerably and ushered in a new wave of interest of natural products.

By 1950 Barney turned over the reins of the daily operations of the business to his children but remained on the Board of his family owned company. By this time, the company had expanded its manufacturing plants and sales nationally to include Detroit, Michigan, Los Lunas, New Mexico, Chicago, Illinois and Atlanta, Georgia. The revenue of the company was now close to 2.5 million dollars.

In the 1960’s the social climate in America had changed and pharmaceutical companies took on greater importance in the treatment of people’s health. The discovery of new drugs and better health care shifted the confidence in the American perspective away from natural products to traditional western medicine. Although the counter culture of America still supported natural supplements, popularity for Barney’s products waned.

In 1965, Wilford’s granddaughter, Geraldine, took over the Research and Development Department (R&D) after receiving a degree in chemistry from Harvard. She had been trained as a child by her grandmother, Wilford’s mother, and knew how the recipes should look. However, she had new ideas and with the approach of the 1970’s, was ready to join the “Anjolie perfume commercial” lifestyle depiction of a 70’s women that “they could bring home the bacon and fry it up too.”

Due to the downturn in sales by 1970, the company turned to other countries for its sales base. Starting in Germany and other European countries where natural products are highly credible, Barney began to license the sale of the company’s products to local manufacturers. The name recognition grew and by the 1980’s the company was grossing over 4 million dollars in gross sales. The company moved to overseas operations and manufactured in Germany. Wilford Barney died in 1981 shortly after seeing his first grandchild, Maximillian Barney, take over the President’s positon of the company.

Studying the trends in the 1990’s about the resurgence of natural health products “Max” as he liked to be called, decided it was time for Barney’s to focus on the new interest in homeopathic and natural products especially at home in America where sales were static. In 1996, Max, wanting to get a sleeker and more modern feel to the company’s products changed the company name and logo. No longer was Barney’s a mom and pop operation but now were part of the Biotech nutraceutical market. Barney’s Elixir and Life Products was now Biotech Health and Life Products. While the products would continue to show the old Barney logo, for name recognition the new logo would take prominence on the packaging.

By 2000 the company was grossing about 1.1 billion in sales with an increase in market share. By 2012, Biotech had a 20% market share of the supplement business

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 3

with approximately $20 billions of sales. The growing interest in the bio-nutraceutical marketplace was catching the attention of the big pharmaceutical companies. Glaxo, Merke and Dupont began a massive shift to the new biotech business products.

Currently sales for the company are at $35 billion. Maximillian Barney is still President and CEO. The stock is still held by the family and all senior management positions are held by family members.

Current Company Vision: To help provide everyone with the healthiest life possible in the most natural of ways.

Current Mission: To develop products that are safe, effective, affordable and natural with the customer’s health always their primary goal.

Current Fact Sheet

Headquarters Yonkers, New York Worldwide web address www.biotechlife.com President Maximillian Barney 2016 Gross Sales US$ 35 billion Employees 35,000 in 6 countries worldwide

Manufacturer Operations

United States Detroit, Michigan, Los Lunas, New Mexico, Chicago, Illinois and Atlanta, Georgia

Europe Wittllch, Germany, Baltimore, Ireland Asia Pacific Melbourne, Australia Latin America and Caribbean Sao Paulo, Brazil Canada

Product Lines

Major Competitors

Alberta, Canada

Protein and Fitness; Personal Care, Nutraceuticals, Vitamins and Food Supplements

Protein and Fitness-GNC, Personal Care- Nestle Skin Care- Galderma, SA; Glaxo, Merke, General Mills. Vitamins and Food Supplements- GNC, Natures Plus, Natrol, Nature’s Way, Nature’s Bounty, Hain Celestial Group, Inc, Schiff Nutrition International, Nestle, General Mills, Now Foods and New Chapter

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 4

BIOTECH BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY AND STRATEGY

Biotech has determined its long-term goal planning pattern should be no longer than 3 years. Three years seems more flexible than the seven-year planning pattern previously used as change in the business climate is making it imperative to be more flexible. The need for innovation and competitive advantage ideas are the main focus for the next two years along with the company’s commitment to becoming a triple bottom line company. Sustainability both for profit and planet is foremost in the minds of the leadership. The development of a triple bottom line company is in the best interest of the company because of the need to keep a strong natural product image link to the community and the desire for the company to be socially responsible. Protection of the suppliers and control over product quality is critical to the development of a sound “life product.”

Current Growth Plans

Business and Sales Biotech is looking to expand to Saudi Arabia in the next year. Currently products sold through European division but demand is great in the Arab countries. Although the company would like to sell in Israel as well, Arab countries are seen as a more lucrative expansion opportunity. Expansion of the production capacity in Sao Paulo is being considered as company can no longer keep up with sales projections.

Product Development Biotech is looking to develop its cosmetic and food lines. Currently have lip balms but seeks to make a line of lipsticks, foundation, powder, eye makeup and cleaners from natural ingredients. Development of natural flavorings and whey products are under consideration.

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 5

BIOTECH’S CORE VALUES The leadership of Biotech has identified four core values. These values are used as guidance in strategy, mission, and vision creation. They are: Customer-Centricity, Innovation, Knowledge, and Sustainability. Customer-Centricity Currently there is a company-wide accountability to the customers and the entire workforce is expected to provide an extraordinary customer experience in every product made. Customer relations are considered to be both internal and external; for those located at central Headquarters, those employees “out in the field” are considered just as much a customer as the person buying Biotech’s products.

Innovation Development of organizational structure and culture changes are being made to introduce more collaborative decision making as well as bringing the divisions closer together in the area of shared resources and communication. Emphasis is to encourage the exchange of ideas, create an environment that fosters new ideas and makes change easier in implementation.

Knowledge Biotech is a firm whose foundation and history is deeply rooted in research and development. Using knowledge to lead change is at the heart of Biotech’s value system. Another aspect to knowledge is the “tribal knowledge” that is inherently known by the Barney family that lead the company, and their long-time loyal employees. Sustainability Currently, Biotech has commitments to build housing for several communities in Brazil and India where natural pharmaceutical ingredients are produced. The program reflects the company’s strong commitment to become a triple bottom line company by the year 2021, and its core value of sustainability. Biotech defines sustainability as both “for profit” and “for planet”.

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 6

BIOTECH’S CURRENT CORPORATE CULTURE

Barney’s new image of a sleek, less clan-like organization has resulted in a family that is less than cohesive. Still, the family leaders are committed to maintaining the businesses’ cultural heritage because of the sense of unity and belonging, and to provide employees with a better understanding of the previous generations and to show how far the company has come. It is believed that the cultural heritage of the business demonstrates support for collaborative decision making something the company has successfully promoted throughout the organization. The family sees its employees as being customers and therefore encourages a customer-centric culture. Employees are encouraged to look at their work through the perspective of the customer and to make decisions using the customer’s viewpoint. Biotech is concerned that the stateside organization is driving the overseas divisions and that new ideas are being encouraged because of the cultural differences in staff. Customer innovation workshops ran by the various divisions have highlighted that R&D in Europe and Australia are differences in customer preferences from US customer preferences. It is believed that US controlled resources are ignoring these product preferences and are thus impeding sales overseas. Corporate leaders are examining the matter in an attempt to answer this cultural gap. Current Organizational Structure

The company has a geographical division structure. However, within each division is a functional structure with production and sales at the hub. R&D, HR, IT and Finance have small staff in each division whose primary job is to liaise with headquarters to implement the decisions made.

Executive Director South America

Division

Executive Director North American

Division

Executive Director European Division

Executive Directive

Asia Division

President and CEO Maximillian Barney

Housed in headquarters is the R&D, Purchasing, HR, IT, and Finance Divisions

The post Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 1 appeared first on graduatepaperhelp.

Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 1

Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 1

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 1

Biotech Health and Life Products Company Profile

Welcome to Biotech! The assessment projects for this class will examine different facets of the leadership of Biotech Health and Life Products, Inc. You will be exploring leadership within Biotech with the driving question of “what skills does a Biotech leader need to lead the company now and in the future?”

History Wilford Barney was a young apprentice working for Peter Ulan, owner of a small apothecary shop in Yonkers, New York. During his apprenticeship, Barney created a general energy elixir that was based on a home remedy of his mother’s back in Ireland. The elixir was produced specifically for many of Ulan’s special customers. Made of all natural ingredients the elixir provided B12 and other vitamins to promote a healthy immune system. The energy boost was noticeable after only a week’s use. The reputation of the elixir grew.

In 1922, Barney took over Ulan’s apothecary shop renaming the business, Barney’s Apothecary. At that time, Barney decided to bottle his elixir and sell the formula to everyone rather than selected customers. Barney also gave bottles of the elixir to local peddlers who sold the product along with their wares receiving a commission on each bottle they sold. By 1929, the product was well known in Yonkers. Encouraged by the success in Yonkers Barney decided to branch out to New York City.

In 1932, Barney built a small manufacturing plant near the store where he mixed and bottled the elixir for sale. By 1934, Barney expanded sales by putting the elixir in a quarter of the apothecary shops in New York City. Sales were booming and customers inquired about other products that Barney’s had.

In 1936, Barney started a new product called Night Relief, another of his mother’s recipes. This product offered relief from night sweats and anxiety caused by menopausal symptoms or nerves. When this product proved a “secret success” with the ladies, Barney decided to bring his mother, Irene, from Ireland, and put her to work making new natural products. With his mother’s help, Barney grew the business into a small but successful manufacturer of natural “life products”. Barney coined “life products” because the products tracked natural life events in the human body and attempted to improve the customer’s discomfort in dealing with them.

The name of the company was changed to Barney’s Elixir and Life Products. The business continued to grow and with his mother’s death in 1938 the company had a gross revenue of $178,000 a year. The depression took a toll on company profits

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 2

but people still needed the boosts to their health and were able to afford Barney’s products as opposed to the medicine offered by doctors and hospitals. During World War II the company supplied the troops with a natural caffeine (Stay Clear) product that would keep soldiers awake for long periods of time and heighten their mental alertness. Government contracts derived from Stay Clear boosted the revenue of the company considerably and ushered in a new wave of interest of natural products.

By 1950 Barney turned over the reins of the daily operations of the business to his children but remained on the Board of his family owned company. By this time, the company had expanded its manufacturing plants and sales nationally to include Detroit, Michigan, Los Lunas, New Mexico, Chicago, Illinois and Atlanta, Georgia. The revenue of the company was now close to 2.5 million dollars.

In the 1960’s the social climate in America had changed and pharmaceutical companies took on greater importance in the treatment of people’s health. The discovery of new drugs and better health care shifted the confidence in the American perspective away from natural products to traditional western medicine. Although the counter culture of America still supported natural supplements, popularity for Barney’s products waned.

In 1965, Wilford’s granddaughter, Geraldine, took over the Research and Development Department (R&D) after receiving a degree in chemistry from Harvard. She had been trained as a child by her grandmother, Wilford’s mother, and knew how the recipes should look. However, she had new ideas and with the approach of the 1970’s, was ready to join the “Anjolie perfume commercial” lifestyle depiction of a 70’s women that “they could bring home the bacon and fry it up too.”

Due to the downturn in sales by 1970, the company turned to other countries for its sales base. Starting in Germany and other European countries where natural products are highly credible, Barney began to license the sale of the company’s products to local manufacturers. The name recognition grew and by the 1980’s the company was grossing over 4 million dollars in gross sales. The company moved to overseas operations and manufactured in Germany. Wilford Barney died in 1981 shortly after seeing his first grandchild, Maximillian Barney, take over the President’s positon of the company.

Studying the trends in the 1990’s about the resurgence of natural health products “Max” as he liked to be called, decided it was time for Barney’s to focus on the new interest in homeopathic and natural products especially at home in America where sales were static. In 1996, Max, wanting to get a sleeker and more modern feel to the company’s products changed the company name and logo. No longer was Barney’s a mom and pop operation but now were part of the Biotech nutraceutical market. Barney’s Elixir and Life Products was now Biotech Health and Life Products. While the products would continue to show the old Barney logo, for name recognition the new logo would take prominence on the packaging.

By 2000 the company was grossing about 1.1 billion in sales with an increase in market share. By 2012, Biotech had a 20% market share of the supplement business

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 3

with approximately $20 billions of sales. The growing interest in the bio-nutraceutical marketplace was catching the attention of the big pharmaceutical companies. Glaxo, Merke and Dupont began a massive shift to the new biotech business products.

Currently sales for the company are at $35 billion. Maximillian Barney is still President and CEO. The stock is still held by the family and all senior management positions are held by family members.

Current Company Vision: To help provide everyone with the healthiest life possible in the most natural of ways.

Current Mission: To develop products that are safe, effective, affordable and natural with the customer’s health always their primary goal.

Current Fact Sheet

Headquarters Yonkers, New York Worldwide web address www.biotechlife.com President Maximillian Barney 2016 Gross Sales US$ 35 billion Employees 35,000 in 6 countries worldwide

Manufacturer Operations

United States Detroit, Michigan, Los Lunas, New Mexico, Chicago, Illinois and Atlanta, Georgia

Europe Wittllch, Germany, Baltimore, Ireland Asia Pacific Melbourne, Australia Latin America and Caribbean Sao Paulo, Brazil Canada

Product Lines

Major Competitors

Alberta, Canada

Protein and Fitness; Personal Care, Nutraceuticals, Vitamins and Food Supplements

Protein and Fitness-GNC, Personal Care- Nestle Skin Care- Galderma, SA; Glaxo, Merke, General Mills. Vitamins and Food Supplements- GNC, Natures Plus, Natrol, Nature’s Way, Nature’s Bounty, Hain Celestial Group, Inc, Schiff Nutrition International, Nestle, General Mills, Now Foods and New Chapter

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 4

BIOTECH BUSINESS PHILOSOPHY AND STRATEGY

Biotech has determined its long-term goal planning pattern should be no longer than 3 years. Three years seems more flexible than the seven-year planning pattern previously used as change in the business climate is making it imperative to be more flexible. The need for innovation and competitive advantage ideas are the main focus for the next two years along with the company’s commitment to becoming a triple bottom line company. Sustainability both for profit and planet is foremost in the minds of the leadership. The development of a triple bottom line company is in the best interest of the company because of the need to keep a strong natural product image link to the community and the desire for the company to be socially responsible. Protection of the suppliers and control over product quality is critical to the development of a sound “life product.”

Current Growth Plans

Business and Sales Biotech is looking to expand to Saudi Arabia in the next year. Currently products sold through European division but demand is great in the Arab countries. Although the company would like to sell in Israel as well, Arab countries are seen as a more lucrative expansion opportunity. Expansion of the production capacity in Sao Paulo is being considered as company can no longer keep up with sales projections.

Product Development Biotech is looking to develop its cosmetic and food lines. Currently have lip balms but seeks to make a line of lipsticks, foundation, powder, eye makeup and cleaners from natural ingredients. Development of natural flavorings and whey products are under consideration.

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 5

BIOTECH’S CORE VALUES The leadership of Biotech has identified four core values. These values are used as guidance in strategy, mission, and vision creation. They are: Customer-Centricity, Innovation, Knowledge, and Sustainability. Customer-Centricity Currently there is a company-wide accountability to the customers and the entire workforce is expected to provide an extraordinary customer experience in every product made. Customer relations are considered to be both internal and external; for those located at central Headquarters, those employees “out in the field” are considered just as much a customer as the person buying Biotech’s products.

Innovation Development of organizational structure and culture changes are being made to introduce more collaborative decision making as well as bringing the divisions closer together in the area of shared resources and communication. Emphasis is to encourage the exchange of ideas, create an environment that fosters new ideas and makes change easier in implementation.

Knowledge Biotech is a firm whose foundation and history is deeply rooted in research and development. Using knowledge to lead change is at the heart of Biotech’s value system. Another aspect to knowledge is the “tribal knowledge” that is inherently known by the Barney family that lead the company, and their long-time loyal employees. Sustainability Currently, Biotech has commitments to build housing for several communities in Brazil and India where natural pharmaceutical ingredients are produced. The program reflects the company’s strong commitment to become a triple bottom line company by the year 2021, and its core value of sustainability. Biotech defines sustainability as both “for profit” and “for planet”.

BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 6

BIOTECH’S CURRENT CORPORATE CULTURE

Barney’s new image of a sleek, less clan-like organization has resulted in a family that is less than cohesive. Still, the family leaders are committed to maintaining the businesses’ cultural heritage because of the sense of unity and belonging, and to provide employees with a better understanding of the previous generations and to show how far the company has come. It is believed that the cultural heritage of the business demonstrates support for collaborative decision making something the company has successfully promoted throughout the organization. The family sees its employees as being customers and therefore encourages a customer-centric culture. Employees are encouraged to look at their work through the perspective of the customer and to make decisions using the customer’s viewpoint. Biotech is concerned that the stateside organization is driving the overseas divisions and that new ideas are being encouraged because of the cultural differences in staff. Customer innovation workshops ran by the various divisions have highlighted that R&D in Europe and Australia are differences in customer preferences from US customer preferences. It is believed that US controlled resources are ignoring these product preferences and are thus impeding sales overseas. Corporate leaders are examining the matter in an attempt to answer this cultural gap. Current Organizational Structure

The company has a geographical division structure. However, within each division is a functional structure with production and sales at the hub. R&D, HR, IT and Finance have small staff in each division whose primary job is to liaise with headquarters to implement the decisions made.

Executive Director South America

Division

Executive Director North American

Division

Executive Director European Division

Executive Directive

Asia Division

President and CEO Maximillian Barney

Housed in headquarters is the R&D, Purchasing, HR, IT, and Finance Divisions

The post Organizational Leadership Biotech Company Profile 1 appeared first on best homeworkhelp.

Memorandum -Marketing homework Assignment

Memorandum -Marketing homework Assignment

Learning Activity #1

You will read the learning activity below and follow the instructions provided. You will create the memorandum and submit in the discussion area.

Read the Following Case Scenario:

A recent survey was taken among employees at Biotech Health and Life Products (Biotech). The results were alarming, as it appeared the leadership has been less effective than in the past. Some of the common complaints seemed to focus on the lack of vision, a breakdown in communication and a lack of connection with staff.

You have read the results and as Vice President of Biotech, you completely agree with employees. Leadership is the cornerstone to success in any organization and to permit poor leadership can only spell trouble. It occurred to you that the place to start change was staring you in the face – the new management hires planned for Warehouse Operations in Dallas and Miami. Mumbling to yourself “but what do I want them to look like?” you decide that you must write a memo to HR Director, Jennifer Diaz to make sure the “right” description of a leader is asked for in the soon-to-be released job description. Scrambling around on the desk, you find the old job announcement so that you can make some changes. It reads, “Biotech is looking for experienced warehouse managers who focus on keeping the distribution speed high and shipping costs low. Manager must be able to motivate employees to keep distribution, packing, and shipping moving smoothly and efficiently. Must be someone who can handle a fast-paced environment, is used to meeting deadlines, is driven and results-oriented. Goal oriented and policy adherence critical to succeed in the department.”

Instructions:

You will act as the Vice President of Biotech. Write a memorandum to the HR Director, Jennifer Diaz that explains the need for a new job announcement for managers at Biotech. The memorandum will explain how the business environment has changed the view of the leader and defines the vision you have based on synthesizing the course material about leadership theory and definition of a leader in today’s business environment opposed to leaders hired in the past.

In writing the memorandum, use the course material from week 1 (you may also use course material from week 2) to support the reasoning and conclusions made. You will also use the Biotech Company Profile .

NOTE: MEMORANDUMS ARE NO MORE THAN 2 PAGES. the memorandum needs to include all the following PROFESSIONALLY: (SAMPLE:

https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/subject_specific_writing/professional_technical_writing/memos/sample_memo.html)

Answer the following:

Explain how the existing job announcement for new hires was effective in the past based on the theories and view of leadership through the 1990’s.

Explain why the leader of today would no longer fit the definition set out in the old announcement.

Describe what a leader looks like today and what theories and leadership definitions support this description.

Memorandum Set Up

Create a Word or Rich Text Format (RTF) document (no pdf files allowed) using 12-point font. A memo is left justified with no indentations of paragraphs. A memo is single-spaced with a double space between paragraphs to make the memo easy to read.

In business, writing must be concise, easy to read and free of writing and grammatical errors.

You are required to use in-text citations with an associated reference list.

Use headings for each element. It is suggested that you set up the memo with all of the required headings and then fill in each section of the memo.

Use a memo format:

To:

From:

Date:

Subject:

Remember, you are sending this memo to the HR Director so this is a formal memo. Proof the memo carefully for typos, grammatical errors and ensure the memo conveys the points you are to address. Why? Because your work products is a reflection of who you are – it is your brand! A good brand can lead to future opportunities in an organization such as a promotion.

Make sure the memo is audience appropriate, concise, coherent, readable, uses appropriate terminology, is professional, provides a factual tone (no opinion and no recommendations), and is visually appealing.

Memorandum Requirements

You are sending this memo to the HR Director, Jennifer Diaz. Read the memo to ensure all required elements are present. You also need to use facts from the case scenario and course material to support the ideas and reasoning put forth.

The language in the announcement has to be just right so that Biotech attracts the best candidates. Therefore, it is important to help Jennifer capture the essence of a leader at Biotech.

Make suggestions about language that should appear in the job announcement that supports the definition and characteristics you derived for the leader of today.

Provide an explanation so Jennifer knows why the specified language is important to convey the definition and characteristics of a leader;

Make suggestions about language that would not be in the job announcement for this leader;

Provide an explanation why the specific language should not be in the job announcement.

Not just anything is acceptable so make sure to read the course material and make wise selections in creating this memo.

The following items are required in writing the memo. Check off to ensure compliance to the following requirements.

Use the grading rubric while completing the project to ensure all requirements are met that will lead to the highest possible grade.

Third person writing is required. Third person means that there are no words such as “I, me, my, we, or us” (first person writing), nor is there use of “you or your” (second person writing).

Contractions are not used in business writing, so do not use them.

Students will not use direct quotation marks but will instead paraphrase. What this means is that you will put the ideas of an author or article into your own words rather than lifting directly from a source document. You may not use more than four consecutive words from a source document (including the case scenario) or change words in a passage as doing so would require direct quotation marks. Use a passage from a source document by putting into your own words (paraphrase) and attribute the passage to the source document. Changing words from a passage does not exclude the passage from having to have quotation marks. If direct quotes are presented, they will not be included in the grading.

Use in-text citations and provide a reference list that contain a reference associated with each in-text citation.

Provide the page or paragraph number in every in-text citation presented. Refer to this link for more guidance on how to do this:

In-Text Citations – Including Page or Paragraph Numbers

Self-plagiarism is the act of reusing significant, identical or nearly identical portions of one’s own work. You cannot re-use any portion of a paper or other graded work that was submitted to another class even if you are retaking this course. You also will not reuse any portion of previously submitted work in this class. A zero will be assigned to the assignment if self-plagiarized. Faculty do not have the discretion to accept self-plagiarized work.

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Narrative Analysis-Psychology homework task

Narrative Analysis-Psychology homework task

By Day 7

Submit a 3- to 5-page paper in which you provide a narrative analysis of the Life Span Interview you completed. The paper should:

Provide a chronological history of the individual’s major life experiences.

Identify specific biological, psychological and sociological influences that shaped the individual’s experience.

Analyze the individual’s experiences by applying theory and concepts learned throughout both HBSE courses.

Provide your reflection of the experience, both in interviewing the individual and analyzing their narrative.

Explain what you learned and how you will apply this to future social work practice.

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Discuss The Organizational IS/IT Structure And How It Relates To The Rest Of The Organization…..And More

Discuss The Organizational IS/IT Structure And How It Relates To The Rest Of The Organization…..And More

Create an APA formatted paper in Microsoft Word.

Using your organization or an organization you are familiar with, describe the organizational IS/IT Structure and how it relates to the rest of the organization. You may choose to create an organizational chart but you must still describe the organization in paragraph form. Would you describe your organization as hierarchical, flat, matrix, or networked? Why? Is this structure appropriate for IS/IT in your organization?

You must describe an actual organization and apply what you have learned to that organization. This course is about application not theory. You must address the questions above.

Use APA guidelines to create a paper in Word. Your paper should have a minimum of 500 words – no more than 600 words – addressing all the areas above. Please include at least 3 scholarly references 5 years or less old plus your text to support your recommendations. You must cite and reference in this paper.

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Corporate Finance Assignment 4

Corporate Finance Assignment 4

Chapter 6:

· Problems (pp. 286-287)

6-1). Portfolio Beta

· Your investment club has only two stocks in its portfolio. $20,000 is invested in a stock with a beta of 0.7, and $35,000 is invested in a stock with a beta of 1.3. What is the portfolio’s beta?

(6-2). Required Rate of Return

· AA Corporation’s stock has a beta of 0.8. The risk-free rate is 4% and the expected return on the market is 12%. What is the required rate of return on AA’s stock?

·

(6-7). Required Rate of Return
· Suppose rRF=5%rRF=5%, rM=10%rM=10%, and rA=12%rA=12%.

a. Calculate Stock A’s beta.

b. If Stock A’s beta were 2.0, then what would be A’s new required rate of return?

6-10). Portfolio Required Return
· Suppose you manage a $4 million fund that consists of four stocks with the following investments:

Introduction to Financial Management

If the market’s required rate of return is 14% and the risk-free rate is 6%, what is the fund’s required rate of return?

·

Chapter 9:

(9-2). After-Tax Cost of Debt
· LL Incorporated’s currently outstanding 11% coupon bonds have a yield to maturity of 8%. LL believes it could issue new bonds at par that would provide a similar yield to maturity. If its marginal tax rate is 35%, what is LL’s after-tax cost of debt?

9-4). Cost of Preferred Stock with Flotation Costs
· Burnwood Tech plans to issue some $60 par preferred stock with a 6% dividend. A similar stock is selling on the market for $70. Burnwood must pay flotation costs of 5% of the issue price. What is the cost of the preferred stock?

·

(9-5). Cost of Equity: Dividend Growth
· Summerdahl Resort’s common stock is currently trading at $36 a share. The stock is expected to pay a dividend of $3.00 a share at the end of the year (D1=$3.00)(D1=$3.00), and the dividend is expected to grow at a constant rate of 5% a year. What is its cost of common equity?

(9-6). Cost of Equity: CAPM
· Booher Book Stores has a beta of 0.8. The yield on a 3-month T-bill is 4%, and the yield on a 10-year T-bond is 6%. The market risk premium is 5.5%, and the return on an average stock in the market last year was 15%. What is the estimated cost of common equity using the CAPM?

(9-7). WACC
· Shi Import-Export’s balance sheet shows $300 million in debt, $50 million in preferred stock, and $250 million in total common equity. Shi’s tax rate is 40%, rd=6%rd=6%, rps=5.8%rps=5.8%, and rs=12%rs=12%. If Shi has a target capital structure of 30% debt, 5% preferred stock, and 65% common stock, what is its WACC?

The post Corporate Finance Assignment 4 appeared first on graduatepaperhelp.

Apple Merging Technology, Business, and Entertainment

Apple Merging Technology, Business, and Entertainment

Case Study

Case Study-1 -Question

Prepare an in-depth analysis of four case studies during the semester. Here are some guidelines:

· This is an individual assessment, which is a part from your course score. It requires effort and critical thinking

· Answer all the questions listed below for each case.

· The ‘answers’ to the questions are best formulated by reviewing the case and the reading materials up and including the current week in the course.

· The questions are worded to help you apply the readings to the case, so don’t limit yourself to the case’s terminology and perspective. The best analysis will abstract the case content by applying the reading materials to draw broader lessons about the material

Case Study 1: Apple Merging Technology, Business, and Entertainment

1) Why are data, information, business intelligence, and knowledge important to Apple? Give an example of each type in relation to the iPad. (1 Mark)

2) Explain how Apple achieved business success through the use of information, information technology, and people. (1 Mark)

3) Evaluate how Apple can gain business intelligence through the implementation of a customer relationship management system. (1 Mark)

Case Study 1: Apple Merging Technology, Business, and Entertainment

This might sound hard to believe, but a bit more than a decade ago, Apple was on the brink of bankruptcy. Apple Computer Inc., now back from near oblivion, is blazing a trail through the digital world with innovation and creativity that has been missing from the company for the past 20 years. The unique feature of Apple’s competitive advantages is that they come from customers and users, not Apple employees. That’s right; the company welcomes products created by consumers to sell to consumers, a trend new to business.

Capitalizing on the iPod

With millions of iPods in the hands of consumers, many people are finding ways to capitalize on the product. John Lin created a prototype of a remote control for the iPod and took his prototype to Macworld, where he found success. A few months later, Lin’s company had Apple’s blessing and a commitment for shelf space in its retail stores. “This is how Apple supports the iPod economy,” Lin said. In the iPod-dominated market, hundreds of companies have been inspired to develop more than 500 accessories—everything from rechargers for the car to $1,500 Fendi bags. Eric Tong, vice president at Belkin, a cable and peripheral manufacturer, believes that 75 percent of all iPod owners purchase at least one accessory—selling over 30 million accessories to date. With most of the products priced between $10 and $200, that puts the iPod economy well over $300 million and perhaps as high as $6 billion. Popular iPod accessories include:

■ Altec Lansing Technologies—iPod speakers and recharger dock ($150).

■ Belkin—TuneCast mobile FM transmitter ($40).

■ Etymotic Research—high-end earphones ($150).

■ Griffin Technology—iTrip FM transmitter ($35).

■ Kate Spade—Geneva faux-croc mini iPod holder ($55).

■ Apple—socks set in six colors: green, purple, blue, orange, pink, and gray ($29).

■ Apple—digital camera connector ($29).

Capitalizing on the iPhone

Looking at someone using an iPhone is an interesting experience because there is a good chance they are not making a phone call. They could be doing a number of things from playing a game to trading stocks, watching a TV show, or even conducting business with a mobile version of salesforce.com ’s customer-management software. In a brilliant strategic move, Apple let outsiders offer software for the iPhone and in less than six months, more than 10,000 applications had been created. In fact, more than 15,000 applications are available at its app store section of iTunes, and they have been downloaded a total of 500 million times. Now, many of the iPhone apps are available for the iPad. The iPhone and iPad app store market is getting so huge relative to other smartphone markets that some developers argue there is little point adapting applications for Google’s Android or any other iPhone competitor. According to Jeff Holden, CEO of Pelago Inc., when he created his social networking company he fully intended to follow the conventional wisdom for how to build a sizable, fast-growing software company: Get your programs on as many platforms and devices as possible. But when he crunched the numbers he came to an interesting business conclusion: The 13 million iPhone owners had already downloaded more applications than the 1.1 billion other cell phone owners! To entrepreneurs, developing a program for the iPhone automatically provides a significantly larger market—almost 94 times larger than its competitors. “Why would I ever build for anything but the iPhone?” Holden asked

Capitalizing on the iPad

Apple’s latest release, the iPad, is a lightweight, portable, tablet computer, similar to the iPhone, that allows customers to download applications, check email, and play music all at the touch of a button. Both the iPhone and the iPad can multitask, allowing customers to read a web page while downloading email in the background over wireless networks. The arrival of the iPad brought a simultaneous expansion of the network of accessories. Because the iPad was designed with an exposed screen and without a camera, separate keyboard, memory card slots, or expansion ports, one might say it was specifically built for accessories. Many owners will modify it in some way, whether for mere decoration or hard-core protection. A few of the new accessories include:

■ iPad Clear Armor screen protector—$35.

■ iPad Antique book case cover—$40.

■ iPad wireless keyboard—$99.

■ iPad overcoat sleeve—$35.

■ iPad Joule luxury stand—$130.

Apple has consistently outperformed its key rivals through the development of its MP3 player, the iPod, and continues to make its products smaller and less expensive, while providing complementary features such as games and applications. For the iPhone, Apple developed a unique application called Siri, a voice-activation system that is capable of recognizing voice commands. Siri can perform all kinds of functions from dialing a contact and creating an email to location services such as “Find my Phone,” ensuring lost phones are found quickly.

Apple’s latest offering is a new service called the iCloud. The iCloud has the ability to collect all

of the content, including videos, photos, songs, books, etc., from customer devices such as iPods,

iPads, and iPhones in one secure location in “the cloud.” Apple customers no longer have to worry about backing up their applications or data because everything is automatically uploaded and stored in the iCloud when using an Apple device. In a fast-paced, technology-driven sector, with competitors quickly following suit, Apple is constantly pressured to develop new products and product extensions. Luckily Apple stays ahead of the pack by focusing on the following key competitive advantages:

■ Customer focus: Apple is driven by customer satisfaction and ensures customers are deeply

involved in product development and application development.

■ Resources and capabilities: Apple continues to invest heavily in research and development to take advantage of new technologies, improved facilities, and cloud infrastructures.

■ Strategic vision: Apple has a clear alignment of its vision, mission, and business leadership and goals.

■ Branding: Apple is the leader in brand loyalty as it has achieved cult status with its authentic

product image.

■ Quality focus: Apple has an outstanding commitment to quality.24

(500 words)

Answer

The post Apple Merging Technology, Business, and Entertainment appeared first on best homeworkhelp.

Apple Merging Technology, Business, and Entertainment

Apple Merging Technology, Business, and Entertainment

Case Study

Case Study-1 -Question

Prepare an in-depth analysis of four case studies during the semester. Here are some guidelines:

· This is an individual assessment, which is a part from your course score. It requires effort and critical thinking

· Answer all the questions listed below for each case.

· The ‘answers’ to the questions are best formulated by reviewing the case and the reading materials up and including the current week in the course.

· The questions are worded to help you apply the readings to the case, so don’t limit yourself to the case’s terminology and perspective. The best analysis will abstract the case content by applying the reading materials to draw broader lessons about the material

Case Study 1: Apple Merging Technology, Business, and Entertainment

1) Why are data, information, business intelligence, and knowledge important to Apple? Give an example of each type in relation to the iPad. (1 Mark)

2) Explain how Apple achieved business success through the use of information, information technology, and people. (1 Mark)

3) Evaluate how Apple can gain business intelligence through the implementation of a customer relationship management system. (1 Mark)

Case Study 1: Apple Merging Technology, Business, and Entertainment

This might sound hard to believe, but a bit more than a decade ago, Apple was on the brink of bankruptcy. Apple Computer Inc., now back from near oblivion, is blazing a trail through the digital world with innovation and creativity that has been missing from the company for the past 20 years. The unique feature of Apple’s competitive advantages is that they come from customers and users, not Apple employees. That’s right; the company welcomes products created by consumers to sell to consumers, a trend new to business.

Capitalizing on the iPod

With millions of iPods in the hands of consumers, many people are finding ways to capitalize on the product. John Lin created a prototype of a remote control for the iPod and took his prototype to Macworld, where he found success. A few months later, Lin’s company had Apple’s blessing and a commitment for shelf space in its retail stores. “This is how Apple supports the iPod economy,” Lin said. In the iPod-dominated market, hundreds of companies have been inspired to develop more than 500 accessories—everything from rechargers for the car to $1,500 Fendi bags. Eric Tong, vice president at Belkin, a cable and peripheral manufacturer, believes that 75 percent of all iPod owners purchase at least one accessory—selling over 30 million accessories to date. With most of the products priced between $10 and $200, that puts the iPod economy well over $300 million and perhaps as high as $6 billion. Popular iPod accessories include:

■ Altec Lansing Technologies—iPod speakers and recharger dock ($150).

■ Belkin—TuneCast mobile FM transmitter ($40).

■ Etymotic Research—high-end earphones ($150).

■ Griffin Technology—iTrip FM transmitter ($35).

■ Kate Spade—Geneva faux-croc mini iPod holder ($55).

■ Apple—socks set in six colors: green, purple, blue, orange, pink, and gray ($29).

■ Apple—digital camera connector ($29).

Capitalizing on the iPhone

Looking at someone using an iPhone is an interesting experience because there is a good chance they are not making a phone call. They could be doing a number of things from playing a game to trading stocks, watching a TV show, or even conducting business with a mobile version of salesforce.com ’s customer-management software. In a brilliant strategic move, Apple let outsiders offer software for the iPhone and in less than six months, more than 10,000 applications had been created. In fact, more than 15,000 applications are available at its app store section of iTunes, and they have been downloaded a total of 500 million times. Now, many of the iPhone apps are available for the iPad. The iPhone and iPad app store market is getting so huge relative to other smartphone markets that some developers argue there is little point adapting applications for Google’s Android or any other iPhone competitor. According to Jeff Holden, CEO of Pelago Inc., when he created his social networking company he fully intended to follow the conventional wisdom for how to build a sizable, fast-growing software company: Get your programs on as many platforms and devices as possible. But when he crunched the numbers he came to an interesting business conclusion: The 13 million iPhone owners had already downloaded more applications than the 1.1 billion other cell phone owners! To entrepreneurs, developing a program for the iPhone automatically provides a significantly larger market—almost 94 times larger than its competitors. “Why would I ever build for anything but the iPhone?” Holden asked

Capitalizing on the iPad

Apple’s latest release, the iPad, is a lightweight, portable, tablet computer, similar to the iPhone, that allows customers to download applications, check email, and play music all at the touch of a button. Both the iPhone and the iPad can multitask, allowing customers to read a web page while downloading email in the background over wireless networks. The arrival of the iPad brought a simultaneous expansion of the network of accessories. Because the iPad was designed with an exposed screen and without a camera, separate keyboard, memory card slots, or expansion ports, one might say it was specifically built for accessories. Many owners will modify it in some way, whether for mere decoration or hard-core protection. A few of the new accessories include:

■ iPad Clear Armor screen protector—$35.

■ iPad Antique book case cover—$40.

■ iPad wireless keyboard—$99.

■ iPad overcoat sleeve—$35.

■ iPad Joule luxury stand—$130.

Apple has consistently outperformed its key rivals through the development of its MP3 player, the iPod, and continues to make its products smaller and less expensive, while providing complementary features such as games and applications. For the iPhone, Apple developed a unique application called Siri, a voice-activation system that is capable of recognizing voice commands. Siri can perform all kinds of functions from dialing a contact and creating an email to location services such as “Find my Phone,” ensuring lost phones are found quickly.

Apple’s latest offering is a new service called the iCloud. The iCloud has the ability to collect all

of the content, including videos, photos, songs, books, etc., from customer devices such as iPods,

iPads, and iPhones in one secure location in “the cloud.” Apple customers no longer have to worry about backing up their applications or data because everything is automatically uploaded and stored in the iCloud when using an Apple device. In a fast-paced, technology-driven sector, with competitors quickly following suit, Apple is constantly pressured to develop new products and product extensions. Luckily Apple stays ahead of the pack by focusing on the following key competitive advantages:

■ Customer focus: Apple is driven by customer satisfaction and ensures customers are deeply

involved in product development and application development.

■ Resources and capabilities: Apple continues to invest heavily in research and development to take advantage of new technologies, improved facilities, and cloud infrastructures.

■ Strategic vision: Apple has a clear alignment of its vision, mission, and business leadership and goals.

■ Branding: Apple is the leader in brand loyalty as it has achieved cult status with its authentic

product image.

■ Quality focus: Apple has an outstanding commitment to quality.24

(500 words)

Answer

The post Apple Merging Technology, Business, and Entertainment appeared first on graduatepaperhelp.

Corporate Finance Assignment 4

Corporate Finance Assignment 4

Chapter 6:

· Problems (pp. 286-287)

6-1). Portfolio Beta

· Your investment club has only two stocks in its portfolio. $20,000 is invested in a stock with a beta of 0.7, and $35,000 is invested in a stock with a beta of 1.3. What is the portfolio’s beta?

(6-2). Required Rate of Return

· AA Corporation’s stock has a beta of 0.8. The risk-free rate is 4% and the expected return on the market is 12%. What is the required rate of return on AA’s stock?

·

(6-7). Required Rate of Return
· Suppose rRF=5%rRF=5%, rM=10%rM=10%, and rA=12%rA=12%.

a. Calculate Stock A’s beta.

b. If Stock A’s beta were 2.0, then what would be A’s new required rate of return?

6-10). Portfolio Required Return
· Suppose you manage a $4 million fund that consists of four stocks with the following investments:

Introduction to Financial Management

If the market’s required rate of return is 14% and the risk-free rate is 6%, what is the fund’s required rate of return?

·

Chapter 9:

(9-2). After-Tax Cost of Debt
· LL Incorporated’s currently outstanding 11% coupon bonds have a yield to maturity of 8%. LL believes it could issue new bonds at par that would provide a similar yield to maturity. If its marginal tax rate is 35%, what is LL’s after-tax cost of debt?

9-4). Cost of Preferred Stock with Flotation Costs
· Burnwood Tech plans to issue some $60 par preferred stock with a 6% dividend. A similar stock is selling on the market for $70. Burnwood must pay flotation costs of 5% of the issue price. What is the cost of the preferred stock?

·

(9-5). Cost of Equity: Dividend Growth
· Summerdahl Resort’s common stock is currently trading at $36 a share. The stock is expected to pay a dividend of $3.00 a share at the end of the year (D1=$3.00)(D1=$3.00), and the dividend is expected to grow at a constant rate of 5% a year. What is its cost of common equity?

(9-6). Cost of Equity: CAPM
· Booher Book Stores has a beta of 0.8. The yield on a 3-month T-bill is 4%, and the yield on a 10-year T-bond is 6%. The market risk premium is 5.5%, and the return on an average stock in the market last year was 15%. What is the estimated cost of common equity using the CAPM?

(9-7). WACC
· Shi Import-Export’s balance sheet shows $300 million in debt, $50 million in preferred stock, and $250 million in total common equity. Shi’s tax rate is 40%, rd=6%rd=6%, rps=5.8%rps=5.8%, and rs=12%rs=12%. If Shi has a target capital structure of 30% debt, 5% preferred stock, and 65% common stock, what is its WACC?

The post Corporate Finance Assignment 4 appeared first on best homeworkhelp.