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Identify a potential data base you can imagine emerging from data within the healthcare electronic systems within your organization and describe its’ potential to improve nursing practice and patient outcomes. Relate the data to quality of care and patient safety. (note: for example EBSCO that includes CINAHL, MEDLINE, etc..)

Identify a potential data base you can imagine emerging from data within the healthcare electronic systems within your organization and describe its’ potential to improve nursing practice and patient outcomes. Relate the data to quality of care and patient safety. (note: for example EBSCO that includes CINAHL, MEDLINE, etc..)

The Development of Nursing Databases

Order Description

In your role as a nurse administrator/leader, you will have the opportunity to utilize established data bases as well as request the development of databases emergent from data found within the healthcare system’s electronic systems. Recognizing this:

1. Identify a potential data base you can imagine emerging from data within the healthcare electronic systems within your organization and describe its’ potential to improve nursing practice and patient outcomes. Relate the data to quality of care and patient safety. (note: for example EBSCO that includes CINAHL, MEDLINE, etc..)

2. Conduct a web search for recognized and credible healthcare database resource r/t to patient care outcomes that may be used in a nursing leadership role. Share the web link along with a brief description of it. Describe an actual or potential use of the database identified from the search. (for example, https://joannabriggs.org/)

3. Submit a brief, one paragraph summary of a relevant and credible article that validates the significance and usefulness of data bases in the provision of healthcare and the improvement of patient outcomes. (note:provide example)

3. End your discussion with a reflection on the significance of using databases in nursing leadership.
(note:provide example)

Support your discussion with citations to at least TWO credible and current scholarly journal articles in addition to the above summarized article. APA citation please.


 

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Complete the two critiques using the appropriate templates.

Complete the two critiques using the appropriate templates.

Order Description

• Select a health topic of interest to you that is relevant to your current area of practice. The topic may be your Course Portfolio Project or a different topic of your choice.
• Using the Walden Library, locate two articles in scholarly journals that deal with your portfolio topic: 1) Select one article that utilizes a quantitative research design and 2) select a second article that utilizes either a qualitative OR a mixed methods design. These need to be single studies not systematic or integrative reviews (including meta-analysis and metasynthesis). You may use research articles from your reference list. If you cannot find these two types of research on your portfolio topic, you may choose another topic.
• Locate the following documents in this week’s Learning Resources to access the appropriate templates, which will guide your critique of each article:
o Critique Template for a Qualitative Study
o Critique Template for a Quantitative Study
o Critique Template for a Mixed-Methods Study
• Consider the fields in the templates as you review the information in each article.
• Begin to draft a paper in which you analyze the two research approaches as indicated below.
• Reflect on the overall value of both quantitative and qualitative research. If someone were to say to you, “Qualitative research is not real science,” how would you respond?
To complete this Assignment:
• Complete the two critiques using the appropriate templates.
• Write a 2- to 3-page paper that addresses the following:
o Contrast the types of information that you gained from examining the two different research approaches in the articles that you selected.
o Describe the general advantages and disadvantages of the two research approaches featured in the articles. Use examples from the articles for support.
o Formulate a response to the claim that qualitative research is not real science. Highlight the general insights that both quantitative and qualitative studies can provide to researchers. Support your response with references to the Learning Resources and other credible sources.


 

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Describe differences between viral and bacterial infections.

Describe differences between viral and bacterial infections.

Antimicrobial Agents
Antimicrobial agents are essential components in the treatment of various bacterial infections as they help to kill or prevent the growth of microbes such as bacteria, fungi, and protozoans. Prior to the discovery of antimicrobial agents, treatment options for patients with bacterial infections were limited. For many patients, treatment often resulted in the amputation of limbs or even death. Today, treatment options for bacterial infections typically have a more positive prognosis. Due to the various types of infections presented in patients, it is essential to be able to identify the underlying cause of the infection?whether bacterial or viral?before recommending drug treatments. This will help you identify whether or not an antimicrobial agent would be appropriate and which specific agent would target the infection. In this Assignment, you consider the appropriate use of antimicrobial agents for infections.
To prepare:
? Review this week?s media presentation on principles of antimicrobial therapy, as well as Chapter 8 of the Arcangelo and Peterson text.
? Consider the categories of antimicrobial agents.
? Think about differences between viral and bacterial infections.
? Reflect on why proper identification of the infection is key to selecting the proper antimicrobial agent.
To complete:
Write a 2- to 3- page paper that addresses the following:
? Describe the categories of antimicrobial agents.
? Describe differences between viral and bacterial infections.
? Explain why proper identification of viral and bacterial infections is key to selecting the proper antimicrobial agent.


 

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Discuss the importance of communication in nursing. Why do nurses need to communicate with patients and colleagues more effectively? Consider this in relation to the evidence on communication in nursing. Are nurse’s effective communicators? Do they communicate sufficiently with patients?

Discuss the importance of communication in nursing. Why do nurses need to communicate with patients and colleagues more effectively? Consider this in relation to the evidence on communication in nursing. Are nurse’s effective communicators? Do they communicate sufficiently with patients?

reflective essay on person-centred communication in nursing
there will be a scenario, you can change on it in way that will help you to write. an reflect on it. try to use the up-dated references.

From the module description
A five thousand word processed assignment on theoretical, ethical, professional and practical perspectives associated with person centred communication skills and approaches

You must complete a five thousand word assignment, which illustrates your knowledge and understanding of the communication process including its application to clinical practice. The assignment will include exploration and discussion of theoretical concepts, practice models and approaches as well as relevant ethical considerations including the awareness of self. Reference to and relevance for your clinical context and client groups will be expected. The work must be supported throughout by appropriate references and/or relevant sources of evidence. The discussion must be based upon sound evidence relevant to personal practice and experience, as well as a range of literature sources including appropriate research.
You will need to discuss your ability to adapt models, skills and strategies to best fit with your client’s needs, the context and your own role as a practitioner. In addition, you will need to discuss your awareness of personal, professional and organisational barriers and/or hindrances to the development of the person centred approach in practice. Also you will need to support your discussion with sources of evidence such as models and/or approaches that identifies and explores strategies for sustaining new developments and change in personal and professional practice.

NOTE
Below, I have outline guidelines for your essay. This is not an exhaustive list of what you should include in your essay, it is some of the points you should consider when writing your essay and a suggested structure to use.
I have listed my ideas for what can be included in each section. This is not to suggest the order in which to include information, or subheadings for sections of the essay.

Introduction
For the introduction, you should identify the area of practice in which you work and the use of person centred communication (PCC) within this field.
Discuss the importance of communication in nursing. Why do nurses need to communicate with patients and colleagues more effectively? Consider this in relation to the evidence on communication in nursing. Are nurse’s effective communicators? Do they communicate sufficiently with patients?
What are the positive aspects of PCC, How does it enhance patient care? Relate this to evidence of its application and effectiveness.
Relate the reasons to the literature, local and national policy. The Code of Conduct for nurses, our accountability and duty of care to our patients.

Person Centred communication
What is communication, models of communication: linear and transactional models. Relating this to how we communicate as nurses in the clinical setting
What is person centred communication? Describe the skills needed to communicate effectively in a caring environment.
Describe the skills and attributes of PCC. Warmth, empathy, unconditional positive regard, genuineness, and trust.
Consider self-awareness, what self-awareness is and why it is important in being person centred, as well as being important for reflective practice. Relate this to literature on self-awareness and reflection.
Describe the basis of PCC, theories and perspective that underlie the approach
Effective listening skills (summarising, reflection of content and feelings, paraphrasing and summarising)
The Use of SOLER and/or SURETY. Consider these two approaches, comparing them, the critique of SOLER, by (Stickley, 2011, Williams and Stickley, 2010)Consider the limitations in applying these models within the nursing field, where the conditions are not always optimal
Critically analyse the above approaches. For example can we really give people “unconditional” positive regard? Are there other theories and ideas of human motivation and development?
Is there empirical evidence to support the theory and the skills?
What is the evidence for the effectiveness of PCC?
Describe the barriers to using PCC in healthcare. This could include discussions of the physical environment and whether this provides adequate time and confidential areas to talk with patients/ families and staff.
What is the culture of nursing? Sometimes nursing emphasises the tasks and clinical skills and spending time with people is not seen as so valuable. Discuss this in relation to the literature on nursing.

The local context
Give a brief description of your area of practice. Describe the context in which you communicate with patients, families or other staff.

Using person centred skills in practice (Reflective account)

Describe an incident in which you have applied PCC in practice. The incident does not have to be a major clinical incident, the important issue is that it allows you to discuss the use of PCC.
In using a reflective approach, what is the evidence for using reflection in nursing practice?
Is reflection recommended by our professional bodies, educational institutions and health organisations?
What was the incident?
What skills did you use?
Did it facilitate better quality care with a patient / family member?
Did it help deal with an emotional issue for staff?
Discuss it in relation to the literature on PCC. In relating the situation to the literature, you should consider the evidence base for the approaches you are using.
You should also bring in literature on PCC, related to your own specialised field of practice. If you work in midwifery, for example, you should use literature on using PCC in this field. If you work in mental health, what does the literature say about using PCC in mental health.
Can it be described in relation to the approaches of Egan, Roger, Heron, or another model of communication
Eg
Developing rapport with a person, and identifying an issue to work on
Developing a goal with the person
Helping the person find a way towards their goal.
Or
Identifying which categories of intervention you used in your situation.
EG
Authoritative
• Prescriptive
• Informative
• Confronting
Facilitative
• Cathartic
• Catalytic
• Supportive

This should finish with a brief summary about what you have learned from discussing and applying PCC in practice

Conclusion
This should discuss implementing a more person centred approach in your area of work. What would be the benefits? Can you think of any negatives?
What would be the barriers in your workplace what could be done to overcome these barriers.
For example: training, changes in the ways of working and culture, education.

Theoretical content
• Person centred models and approaches such as the six categories of interventions (Heron 2001) and the three staged helping approach (Egan 2006). Professional, ethical and legal aspects of communication skills in practice.
• Demonstrate the application of enhanced self-awareness through self-appraisal and reflection on action
• Concepts of support, supervision and development
• Research evidence regarding effective styles of communication
• The application of person centred communication skills
• The communication skills process
• The application and principles of intentionality of person centred communication skills
• Reflective and analytical skill development
• The Integration of ethical, professional and legal issues in practice
• Practical support, supervision and development
• The application of approaches and/or skills to specialist areas of practice

if you can use these references if available, it will help
Reading List
• Bach S, and Grant A., 2009 Communication and Interpersonal Skills for Nurses, Exeter, Learning Matters Ltd
• Donnelly E. and Neville L. 2008 Communication and Interpersonal Skills (Health and Social Care: Knowledge and Skills) Newton Abbot, Reflect Press Ltd
• Hargie O. (Ed) 2006 The Handbook of Communication Skills Hove Routledge
• Hough M. (2006) Counselling Skills and Theory London, Hodder and Stoughton
• Moss B. 2007 Communication Skills for Health and Social Care, London, Sage

You can use these references also as they are the most up-dated refernces:
1- Morrisey J. Callaghan P., 2011 Communication skills for mental health nurses. Berkghire, McGran Hill Open university
2- Bach S., Gant A., 2011, communication and interpersonal skills in nursing 2nd editionexetes:learning matters

this is the scenario:
One day during morning shift. One mother came from home carrying her 5 days old term baby. Firstly, she attend nursing station of low dependency. She called the staff nurse who was working with her assigned babies. The nurse came to see the baby as in the beginning she asked the mother to put her baby under warmer. The mother put her baby. She told the nurse that her baby is yellowish in colour as he has jaundice. The nurse called the doctor to examine the baby and in the same time she examined him. He was totally dark yellowish in colour and he was not breathing at all. The staff nurse informed the doctor for the second time. He told her to take the baby immediately to intermediate-dependency (ID). The nurse told the mother that she will shift the baby to another dependency. She shifted him along with his mother and put him under the warmer. The doctor immediately came. I attend to help the doctor with another staff nurses. We asked the mother to stay outside the dependency so she will not get panic and she response by nodding her head and she stayed out. Ambubagging, intubation, intraventricular cannulation, arterial line insertion and blood sample collection done. The mother was crying outside ID as she did not know what happened for her baby. After finishing the procedure, the baby had put inside intensive phototherapy machine as a prophylactic therapy and endotracheal tube (ETT) connected to ventilator in isolation room. One of the senior staff assigned for that baby. The doctor told me that he wants to speak to the parents. I took them to the seminar room in our ward. I close the door with my presence and the doctor. Most of chairs were arranged. I kept one chair for the doctor in front of parent’s chairs. I sat on a chair beside. The doctor start to take history from them. He informed them about the procedures done with explanation of reasons of implementing them by using simple and understandable words without using medical terms in order to reduce their fears. After finishing, both the doctor and father left. I took permission from the other to sit. I sat in front of her with maintaining eye contact most of the time. I asked her about what did she observe in the baby and what feelings she experienced. She expressed her feelings. I touch her hands and showed her that I understand her feelings of fear as he is her baby and not to feel mistaken by herself. I asked her about the reasons she is thinking it is the cause. She identified that she is not having enough milk and she is not having enough milk and she is not exposing her baby to the sun as he needed in this age I replied that less milk and unexposed to sun are the reasons. Finally, I closed our discussion by summarizing of key points that already we discussed together. Then we left. After laboratory results came, the doctor advice for complete blood exchange. It was done by an expert doctor, but those interventions did not help the baby so much as he passed away the next day.


 

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Rs241; corry 1.5 pages summary

Rs241; corry 1.5 pages summary

IN1484

Driving the Future:

How Autonomous Vehicles Will Change Industries and Strategy

07/2018-6417

This case was written by Guoli Chen, Associate Professor of Strategy at INSEAD, and Michael Olenick, Institute Executive Fellow, Blue Ocean Strategy Institute, under the supervision of W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne, Professors at INSEAD. It is intended to be used as a basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate either effective or ineffective handling of an administrative situation.

Additional material about INSEAD case studies (e.g., videos, spreadsheets, links) can be accessed at cases.insead.edu.

Copyright © 2018 INSEAD

COPIES MAY NOT BE MADE WITHOUT PERMISSION. NO PART OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE COPIED, STORED, TRANSMITTED, REPRODUCED OR DISTRIBUTED IN ANY FORM OR MEDIUM WHATSOEVER WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF THE COPYRIGHT OWNER.

For the exclusive use of Y. Zhang, 2019.

This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

http://cases.insead.edu/
Copyright © INSEAD 1

Feb. 25, 1957 Life Magazine Advertisement. Caption: “One day your car may speed along an electric highway, its speed and steering automatically controlled by electronic devices… Travel will be more enjoyable. Highways will be made safe – by electricity! No traffic jams … no collisions … no driver fatigue.”

… I can remember when there wasn’t an automobile in the world with brains enough to find its own way home. I chauffeured dead lumps of machines that needed a man’s hand at the controls every minute. Every year machines like that used to kill tens of thousands of people.

The automatics fixed that. A positronic brain can react much faster than a human one, of course, and it paid people to keep hands off the controls. You got in, punched your destination and let it go on its way.

We take it for granted now, but I remember when the first laws came out forcing the old machines off the highways and limiting travel to automatics. Lord, what a fuss. They called it everything from communism to fascism, but it emptied the highways and stopped the killing, and still more people get around more easily the new way.

Of course, the automatics were ten to a hundred times as expensive as the hand-driven ones, and there weren’t many that could afford a private vehicle. The industry

For the exclusive use of Y. Zhang, 2019.

This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

Copyright © INSEAD 2

specialized in turning out omnibus-automatics. You could always call a company and have one stop at your door in a matter of minutes and take you where you wanted to go. Usually, you had to drive with others who were going your way, but what’s wrong with that?

“Sally” by Isaac Asimov, 1953

Self-driving cars, also known as autonomous vehicles (AV), are rapidly accelerating from science fiction to showroom fact. Every major auto manufacturer, auto parts maker, and several large technology companies are racing to commercialize AV technology.

In 2001, the US Congress mandated that one third of all military air and ground vehicles drive unmanned by 2015.1 The Congressional mandate was for “unmanned, remotely-controlled enabling technologies” – remote-controlled cars – but the military wanted vehicles that required no driver at all. Initial progress was slow. Vehicles produced by traditional military contractors never exceeded 10mph (16kph) and required multiple human interventions every kilometre.

Frustrated by the lack of progress, the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the organization that created the internet, announced the DARPA Grand Challenge, a series of robot-car races. In 2004, DARPA challenged robot builders to a 142 mile (228.5 km) race with no driver and a $1 million prize. Fifteen teams qualified and Carnegie Mellon University’s robot travelled the furthest, 7.32 miles (11.78 km). Nobody won. Undeterred, DARPA announced another race for 2005: 132-miles (212k m) with a $2 million prize. Nearly 200 teams applied and, after qualifying obstacle courses, 43 remained. More tests whittled that to 20 teams and five robots finished.2 Stanford won, completing the race in just under seven hours; Carnegie-Mellon came second. In 2007, DARPA issued an “urban challenge” for cars to navigate a mock city, with prize money of $2 million, $1 million, and $500,000 (for first, second, and third place).3 Six teams finished. Carnegie Mellon won, Stanford came in second and Virginia Tech third.

Google co-founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page attended the 2005 race, in disguise, then hired Stanford team lead Sebastian Thrun to continue developing the technology.4 By 2007, Thrun’s car, built in cooperation with Stanford, finished second in the Urban Challenge, after Carnegie Mellon. By 2010 Google had created a research lab, “Google X”, with self-driving cars as the first project.

While the army was interested in ambush-proof resupply missions, civilian scientists focused on reducing accidents and increased productivity. In 2015 (the last year for which data is available), there were 35,092 traffic fatalities in the US, 1.1 fatality for every 100 million miles driven. That

1 https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-106publ398/html/PLAW-106publ398.htm 2 Stanford won. Carnegie-Mellon fielded two autonomous vehicles that finished in second and third place. The

Gray Insurance Company of New Orleans, LA, created a car that finished fourth, and a group of defense contractors led by Oshkosh Truck Corporation, finished fifth.

3 DARPA provided $1,000,000 of pre-race funding to each of 11 teams considered most like to build a viable autonomous vehicle.

4 Google never indicated if the firm initially intended to build a self-driving car or wanted Thrun for his talent as a technology visionary with strong engineering skills.

For the exclusive use of Y. Zhang, 2019.

This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-106publ398/html/PLAW-106publ398.htm
Copyright © INSEAD 3

was a vast improvement on 1921, when there were 24.09 fatalities for every 100 million miles driven. The figure declined almost every year thanks to improved safety technology.

Autonomous vehicles are a natural evolution. Experts believe vehicles will inevitably evolve to be autonomous, connected, and primarily driven by electricity rather than internal combustion engines.

“There are so many negatives to owning and operating a car: having to drive it, having to park it, having to fuel it, having to shop for it,” said University of Michigan Professor Larry Burns, former Chief Technology Officer of GM and a consultant with Waymo (Google’s self-driving car spinoff) since 2010. “What we’re really doing is moving a person from one point to another. But actually the automobile is a lot more than that. It’s about having freedom to go where you want, when you want, and who you want to travel with. It became clear to me there’s this convergence of connected, driverless, shared, tailor-designed electrically-driven vehicles. The innovators’ business model was converging with technology and design that is dramatically better at significantly lower cost.”

Autonomous driving, more than any factor, will change the entire driving experience.

“In the historical ecosystem of roadway transportation, a company like General Motors would spend a half billion dollars to develop a new Malibu,” said Professor Burns, who emphasizes the division between “making things and making value”. “They’ll do that over a three-year development period then they’ll put that Malibu on the market and sell it through dealers for 6-10 years and Exon-Mobile will sell gasoline and Allstate will insure it and GMAC will finance it and somebody else will do the service. Now what we’re seeing are these different models where we’re selling miles, trips, and experiences. It’s a whole different business model. You make money off of every mile sold rather than one time on every car.”

Besides lower cost, self-driving cars are safer and change the entire driving experience. “Imagine that you subscribe to Mercedes for a one-year period and have exclusive use of a Mercedes,” said Professor Burns. “You have a condominium and your exclusive-use vehicle will show up at the front door of your condominium and then will go park itself; it’s smart enough to do that on its own. It won’t need to be charged or it’s gas tank topped-off: Mercedes has your back by – when you’re not using your vehicle – making sure that your vehicle’s being fuelled, washed, and maintained. Then Amazon wants to deliver you a package and your vehicle is parked in some area near where you work one day. Amazon can deliver that in your secured vehicle. Now you have an interplay between package delivery. Another thing that may happen that day is you need to pick up your dry cleaning. You’re at work so you dispatch your little robot exclusive-use vehicle to the dry cleaners to pick-up your dry cleaning. On the way to pick you up (at work), it stops to get a take- home meal. Now your trip home doesn’t include picking up dinner and dry-cleaning. Your trip home is going home. This car, this machine, has been your servant during the day.”

Except for interior comfort, self-driving cars are likely to be a largely undifferentiated commodity. What happens when “The Ultimate Driving Machine,” BMW’s tagline, ultimately drives itself and does so like every other car? “The ultimate driving machine in a traffic jam is like any other car,” answered BMW’s Andreas Klugescheid, Head of Steering Governmental and External Affairs and

For the exclusive use of Y. Zhang, 2019.

This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

Copyright © INSEAD 4

Sustainability Communications, when asked that question. “I would claim the majority of my driving would be ideal for autonomous driving but there are times I still love to drive.” Klugescheid highlights that automotive technology is continually changing and that self-driving technology is one of many changes. “In the last 100 years the car always had fuel in the tank and a combustion engine under the hood. In 5-10 years they won’t. So there’s clearly change.”

Prof. Burns summarizes the challenge succinctly: “What I’d set out to do if I were BMW is make a machine where you feel better when you get out of it than you felt when you got into it. Maybe you feel better because you had productive time. Maybe you feel better because you were able to spend some time with your kid. Maybe you feel better because you took a nap. Maybe you feel better because you were able to just sit and relax. The benefit of the vehicle isn’t about 0-60 (how fast a car can accelerate); it’s about acceleration that’s not even perceived. It’s about cornering in a way where you would never get carsick. It’s about being able to stretch out and be comfortable. It’s about lighting and sound and quietness and all of those things are so important to this new riding experience.”

But it remains unclear how automobile manufacturers might meaningfully differentiate their offerings. Acceleration? – irrelevant. Handling? – many won’t have a steering wheel. Safety? – they will never crash unless a traditional car runs into them, and even then will be more likely to avoid reckless drivers than human-driven cars could. Customers can own one, summon one from a taxi service like Uber or Lyft, or from fleets owned by auto manufacturers.

Let’s review a list of high-end and mass market automaker taglines:

BMW “The Ultimate Driving Machine” Mercedes “Unlike Any Other” Lexus “The Passionate Pursuit of Perfection” Audi “Advancement Through Technology” Chevrolet (GM) “Find New Roads” Toyota “Let’s Go Places” Honda “Start Something Special” Ford “Go Further”

One area virtually all experts agree upon is that fewer overall units will be produced and sold because AV’s encourage sharing. A privately-owned AV can service an entire family, dropping spouses off at different offices and driving children around. Shared AV’s fulfil the same function and, as computer algorithms match people going in the same direction, might do so in comparable commute times as privately-owned vehicles. The most optimistic estimate for the auto industry, by far, is from McKinsey, which predicts that vastly increased auto sales in developing countries will offset declining sales in developed countries, leading to a flat market. Barclay’s estimates a 40% decline in units produced and sold before the market stabilizes. Prof. Burns and other experts predict the decline in vehicle sales will be closer to 75%.

For the exclusive use of Y. Zhang, 2019.

This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

Copyright © INSEAD 5

Traditional Two-Car Family Family Shared Self-Driving Car (FAV)

Source: Barclays Research

Self-Driving Taxi (SAV) Self-Driving Shared Ride Taxi (PSAV)

Source: Barclays Research

For the exclusive use of Y. Zhang, 2019.

This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

Copyright © INSEAD 6

Questions to discuss

• What do you think about the trend towards autonomous vehicles (AV)? Is it decisive and irreversible? Why or why not?

• Choose an industry you understand and explain how autonomous vehicles might impact that industry. Think about a “to-be” new opportunity autonomous vehicles enable and briefly explain your idea using Kim & Mauborgne’s Eliminate-Reduce-Raise-Create Grid.

• Use autonomous vehicles to discuss the industry evolution, the roles of different players, and the shift of the profit pool.

• Is autonomous driving technology a blue ocean opportunity? Why or why not?

• What, if anything, is the difference between technology innovation and value innovation?

For the exclusive use of Y. Zhang, 2019.

This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

… I can remember when there wasn’t an automobile in the world with brains enough to find its own way home. I chauffeured dead lumps of machines that needed a man’s hand at the controls every minute. Every year machines like that used to kill tens of t…
The automatics fixed that. A positronic brain can react much faster than a human one, of course, and it paid people to keep hands off the controls. You got in, punched your destination and let it go on its way.
We take it for granted now, but I remember when the first laws came out forcing the old machines off the highways and limiting travel to automatics. Lord, what a fuss. They called it everything from communism to fascism, but it emptied the highways an…
Of course, the automatics were ten to a hundred times as expensive as the hand-driven ones, and there weren’t many that could afford a private vehicle. The industry specialized in turning out omnibus-automatics. You could always call a company and hav…
“Sally” by Isaac Asimov, 1953
Questions to discuss

The post Rs241; corry 1.5 pages summary appeared first on best homeworkhelp.

Rs241; corry 1.5 pages summary

Rs241; corry 1.5 pages summary

IN1484

Driving the Future:

How Autonomous Vehicles Will Change Industries and Strategy

07/2018-6417

This case was written by Guoli Chen, Associate Professor of Strategy at INSEAD, and Michael Olenick, Institute Executive Fellow, Blue Ocean Strategy Institute, under the supervision of W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne, Professors at INSEAD. It is intended to be used as a basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate either effective or ineffective handling of an administrative situation.

Additional material about INSEAD case studies (e.g., videos, spreadsheets, links) can be accessed at cases.insead.edu.

Copyright © 2018 INSEAD

COPIES MAY NOT BE MADE WITHOUT PERMISSION. NO PART OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE COPIED, STORED, TRANSMITTED, REPRODUCED OR DISTRIBUTED IN ANY FORM OR MEDIUM WHATSOEVER WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF THE COPYRIGHT OWNER.

For the exclusive use of Y. Zhang, 2019.

This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

http://cases.insead.edu/
Copyright © INSEAD 1

Feb. 25, 1957 Life Magazine Advertisement. Caption: “One day your car may speed along an electric highway, its speed and steering automatically controlled by electronic devices… Travel will be more enjoyable. Highways will be made safe – by electricity! No traffic jams … no collisions … no driver fatigue.”

… I can remember when there wasn’t an automobile in the world with brains enough to find its own way home. I chauffeured dead lumps of machines that needed a man’s hand at the controls every minute. Every year machines like that used to kill tens of thousands of people.

The automatics fixed that. A positronic brain can react much faster than a human one, of course, and it paid people to keep hands off the controls. You got in, punched your destination and let it go on its way.

We take it for granted now, but I remember when the first laws came out forcing the old machines off the highways and limiting travel to automatics. Lord, what a fuss. They called it everything from communism to fascism, but it emptied the highways and stopped the killing, and still more people get around more easily the new way.

Of course, the automatics were ten to a hundred times as expensive as the hand-driven ones, and there weren’t many that could afford a private vehicle. The industry

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This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

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specialized in turning out omnibus-automatics. You could always call a company and have one stop at your door in a matter of minutes and take you where you wanted to go. Usually, you had to drive with others who were going your way, but what’s wrong with that?

“Sally” by Isaac Asimov, 1953

Self-driving cars, also known as autonomous vehicles (AV), are rapidly accelerating from science fiction to showroom fact. Every major auto manufacturer, auto parts maker, and several large technology companies are racing to commercialize AV technology.

In 2001, the US Congress mandated that one third of all military air and ground vehicles drive unmanned by 2015.1 The Congressional mandate was for “unmanned, remotely-controlled enabling technologies” – remote-controlled cars – but the military wanted vehicles that required no driver at all. Initial progress was slow. Vehicles produced by traditional military contractors never exceeded 10mph (16kph) and required multiple human interventions every kilometre.

Frustrated by the lack of progress, the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the organization that created the internet, announced the DARPA Grand Challenge, a series of robot-car races. In 2004, DARPA challenged robot builders to a 142 mile (228.5 km) race with no driver and a $1 million prize. Fifteen teams qualified and Carnegie Mellon University’s robot travelled the furthest, 7.32 miles (11.78 km). Nobody won. Undeterred, DARPA announced another race for 2005: 132-miles (212k m) with a $2 million prize. Nearly 200 teams applied and, after qualifying obstacle courses, 43 remained. More tests whittled that to 20 teams and five robots finished.2 Stanford won, completing the race in just under seven hours; Carnegie-Mellon came second. In 2007, DARPA issued an “urban challenge” for cars to navigate a mock city, with prize money of $2 million, $1 million, and $500,000 (for first, second, and third place).3 Six teams finished. Carnegie Mellon won, Stanford came in second and Virginia Tech third.

Google co-founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page attended the 2005 race, in disguise, then hired Stanford team lead Sebastian Thrun to continue developing the technology.4 By 2007, Thrun’s car, built in cooperation with Stanford, finished second in the Urban Challenge, after Carnegie Mellon. By 2010 Google had created a research lab, “Google X”, with self-driving cars as the first project.

While the army was interested in ambush-proof resupply missions, civilian scientists focused on reducing accidents and increased productivity. In 2015 (the last year for which data is available), there were 35,092 traffic fatalities in the US, 1.1 fatality for every 100 million miles driven. That

1 https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-106publ398/html/PLAW-106publ398.htm 2 Stanford won. Carnegie-Mellon fielded two autonomous vehicles that finished in second and third place. The

Gray Insurance Company of New Orleans, LA, created a car that finished fourth, and a group of defense contractors led by Oshkosh Truck Corporation, finished fifth.

3 DARPA provided $1,000,000 of pre-race funding to each of 11 teams considered most like to build a viable autonomous vehicle.

4 Google never indicated if the firm initially intended to build a self-driving car or wanted Thrun for his talent as a technology visionary with strong engineering skills.

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This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

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was a vast improvement on 1921, when there were 24.09 fatalities for every 100 million miles driven. The figure declined almost every year thanks to improved safety technology.

Autonomous vehicles are a natural evolution. Experts believe vehicles will inevitably evolve to be autonomous, connected, and primarily driven by electricity rather than internal combustion engines.

“There are so many negatives to owning and operating a car: having to drive it, having to park it, having to fuel it, having to shop for it,” said University of Michigan Professor Larry Burns, former Chief Technology Officer of GM and a consultant with Waymo (Google’s self-driving car spinoff) since 2010. “What we’re really doing is moving a person from one point to another. But actually the automobile is a lot more than that. It’s about having freedom to go where you want, when you want, and who you want to travel with. It became clear to me there’s this convergence of connected, driverless, shared, tailor-designed electrically-driven vehicles. The innovators’ business model was converging with technology and design that is dramatically better at significantly lower cost.”

Autonomous driving, more than any factor, will change the entire driving experience.

“In the historical ecosystem of roadway transportation, a company like General Motors would spend a half billion dollars to develop a new Malibu,” said Professor Burns, who emphasizes the division between “making things and making value”. “They’ll do that over a three-year development period then they’ll put that Malibu on the market and sell it through dealers for 6-10 years and Exon-Mobile will sell gasoline and Allstate will insure it and GMAC will finance it and somebody else will do the service. Now what we’re seeing are these different models where we’re selling miles, trips, and experiences. It’s a whole different business model. You make money off of every mile sold rather than one time on every car.”

Besides lower cost, self-driving cars are safer and change the entire driving experience. “Imagine that you subscribe to Mercedes for a one-year period and have exclusive use of a Mercedes,” said Professor Burns. “You have a condominium and your exclusive-use vehicle will show up at the front door of your condominium and then will go park itself; it’s smart enough to do that on its own. It won’t need to be charged or it’s gas tank topped-off: Mercedes has your back by – when you’re not using your vehicle – making sure that your vehicle’s being fuelled, washed, and maintained. Then Amazon wants to deliver you a package and your vehicle is parked in some area near where you work one day. Amazon can deliver that in your secured vehicle. Now you have an interplay between package delivery. Another thing that may happen that day is you need to pick up your dry cleaning. You’re at work so you dispatch your little robot exclusive-use vehicle to the dry cleaners to pick-up your dry cleaning. On the way to pick you up (at work), it stops to get a take- home meal. Now your trip home doesn’t include picking up dinner and dry-cleaning. Your trip home is going home. This car, this machine, has been your servant during the day.”

Except for interior comfort, self-driving cars are likely to be a largely undifferentiated commodity. What happens when “The Ultimate Driving Machine,” BMW’s tagline, ultimately drives itself and does so like every other car? “The ultimate driving machine in a traffic jam is like any other car,” answered BMW’s Andreas Klugescheid, Head of Steering Governmental and External Affairs and

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This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

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Sustainability Communications, when asked that question. “I would claim the majority of my driving would be ideal for autonomous driving but there are times I still love to drive.” Klugescheid highlights that automotive technology is continually changing and that self-driving technology is one of many changes. “In the last 100 years the car always had fuel in the tank and a combustion engine under the hood. In 5-10 years they won’t. So there’s clearly change.”

Prof. Burns summarizes the challenge succinctly: “What I’d set out to do if I were BMW is make a machine where you feel better when you get out of it than you felt when you got into it. Maybe you feel better because you had productive time. Maybe you feel better because you were able to spend some time with your kid. Maybe you feel better because you took a nap. Maybe you feel better because you were able to just sit and relax. The benefit of the vehicle isn’t about 0-60 (how fast a car can accelerate); it’s about acceleration that’s not even perceived. It’s about cornering in a way where you would never get carsick. It’s about being able to stretch out and be comfortable. It’s about lighting and sound and quietness and all of those things are so important to this new riding experience.”

But it remains unclear how automobile manufacturers might meaningfully differentiate their offerings. Acceleration? – irrelevant. Handling? – many won’t have a steering wheel. Safety? – they will never crash unless a traditional car runs into them, and even then will be more likely to avoid reckless drivers than human-driven cars could. Customers can own one, summon one from a taxi service like Uber or Lyft, or from fleets owned by auto manufacturers.

Let’s review a list of high-end and mass market automaker taglines:

BMW “The Ultimate Driving Machine” Mercedes “Unlike Any Other” Lexus “The Passionate Pursuit of Perfection” Audi “Advancement Through Technology” Chevrolet (GM) “Find New Roads” Toyota “Let’s Go Places” Honda “Start Something Special” Ford “Go Further”

One area virtually all experts agree upon is that fewer overall units will be produced and sold because AV’s encourage sharing. A privately-owned AV can service an entire family, dropping spouses off at different offices and driving children around. Shared AV’s fulfil the same function and, as computer algorithms match people going in the same direction, might do so in comparable commute times as privately-owned vehicles. The most optimistic estimate for the auto industry, by far, is from McKinsey, which predicts that vastly increased auto sales in developing countries will offset declining sales in developed countries, leading to a flat market. Barclay’s estimates a 40% decline in units produced and sold before the market stabilizes. Prof. Burns and other experts predict the decline in vehicle sales will be closer to 75%.

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This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

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Traditional Two-Car Family Family Shared Self-Driving Car (FAV)

Source: Barclays Research

Self-Driving Taxi (SAV) Self-Driving Shared Ride Taxi (PSAV)

Source: Barclays Research

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This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

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Questions to discuss

• What do you think about the trend towards autonomous vehicles (AV)? Is it decisive and irreversible? Why or why not?

• Choose an industry you understand and explain how autonomous vehicles might impact that industry. Think about a “to-be” new opportunity autonomous vehicles enable and briefly explain your idea using Kim & Mauborgne’s Eliminate-Reduce-Raise-Create Grid.

• Use autonomous vehicles to discuss the industry evolution, the roles of different players, and the shift of the profit pool.

• Is autonomous driving technology a blue ocean opportunity? Why or why not?

• What, if anything, is the difference between technology innovation and value innovation?

For the exclusive use of Y. Zhang, 2019.

This document is authorized for use only by Yijia Zhang in ENTR 2301 Ruth 2 taught by Ruth Raubitschek, Northeastern University from Jan 2019 to Jul 2019.

… I can remember when there wasn’t an automobile in the world with brains enough to find its own way home. I chauffeured dead lumps of machines that needed a man’s hand at the controls every minute. Every year machines like that used to kill tens of t…
The automatics fixed that. A positronic brain can react much faster than a human one, of course, and it paid people to keep hands off the controls. You got in, punched your destination and let it go on its way.
We take it for granted now, but I remember when the first laws came out forcing the old machines off the highways and limiting travel to automatics. Lord, what a fuss. They called it everything from communism to fascism, but it emptied the highways an…
Of course, the automatics were ten to a hundred times as expensive as the hand-driven ones, and there weren’t many that could afford a private vehicle. The industry specialized in turning out omnibus-automatics. You could always call a company and hav…
“Sally” by Isaac Asimov, 1953
Questions to discuss

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coffee lab report-Science homework Assignment

coffee lab report-Science homework Assignment

Lab Report 3

Yuying Sun 914696885

Ting Xie 914835183

Tongyang Zhou 916011002

Scatter Plot

As time passed by, pH decreases, which means coffee will get more acidic if it is left for too long

pH vs. Time

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 6.1 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.6 5.5 5.5 5.4 5.3 5.3 5.3 5.3

Time (min)

pH

Calculation

Clever Coffee Brews of the Light and the Dark

The light roast coffee tastes sourer, and it is more acidic than the dark roast one. The dark roast one tastes bitter. Therefore, we all think that the dark roast coffee is better.

Short Answer

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Criminal 4.1-Law homework Assignment

Criminal 4.1-Law homework Assignment

Marion and Oliver define interest groups as “pressure group, special interest, organized interest, of faction, as a group of citizens who are organized and attempt to influence legislation so it reflects their interest or policy goals.” (p.281). Consider exploring the sources in the CRJ510 Professional Resources ListPreview the document to assist your research for this activity.

Initial Post: Read the Lutze and Schaefer article and use it as a springboard for this discussion. Reentry and rehabilitation programs are controversial and have proponents on both sides of the issues. Explain the role special interest groups play in their effort to influence legislation that dictates reentry and rehabilitation policy. Then from a macro perspective, should there be so many access points that allow special interest groups to access legislators? What are the negatives to allowing special interest groups to have an active role in political campaigns? Support your claims with examples from the required materials and/or other scholarly sources, and properly cite your references with both in-text and APA citations at the end of your post.

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WANT A MATH GURU PLEASE

WANT A MATH GURU PLEASE

Create an appropriate model for each situation below. Create your model and solve the problem. Show all calculations. Round to two decimal places unless stated otherwise.

  1. A projectile’s motion can be modeled by the quadratic equation:

h = -gt² + v0t + h0where h = height from the ground; g = gravity constant (16 if units in ft; 4.9 if in meters); t = time in second elapsed from release of projectile; v0= initial velocity; h0= initial height. Write the equation for a projectile that is dropped (v0= 0) from a height of 100 ft. When will it hit the ground? Change the equation to reflect that the object is thrown upward from an initial height of 6 ft at 30 ft/sec. When will the object be back at the starting height? Hit the ground?

  1. The speed of a vehicle can be determined from the length of the skid mark using the following formula: S = where S is the calculated speed and D is the length of the skid mark in feet. How fast was the vehicle traveling if it left a 210 ft skid mark? How long of a skid mark would a vehicle traveling at 45 mph make?
  2. A group is going to a state fair. If children’s tickets are $7.50 per child and adult tickets are $12 per adult, how many of each can go to the fair for $200? Write a linear inequality, graph it, and show several solutions on your graph. Write at least 5 possible solutions.

Suspension bridge project

Most suspension bridges are approximately parabolic in shape in the main section of the bridge. The two towers for suspending the cable define the outer boundaries of the parabola. Using the data about the bridges from the table below, create an equation for the parabola, and graph the section between the towers for each bridge.

Name

Height of towers

Distance between towers

Location

Verrazano Narrows

693 ft

4260 ft

New York, NY

Golden Gate

746 ft

4200 ft

San Francisco, CA

Akashi-Kaikyo

979 ft

6532 ft

Kobe, Japan

Finance models project

Using the exponential model for compound interest earned periodically, solve the following. Assume all interest is compounded monthly unless otherwise given, and the interest rate is 2.625%. Remember to show all calculations and how you used the formula. Show what numbers you enter into the calculator.

  1. Assume that you deposited $1000 in an investment account on your 18thbirthday. How much would you have in the account now? How much would you have on your 68thbirthday?
  2. Assume the account was opened on your 25thbirthday; how much would be in the account on your 68thbirthday?
  3. Assume the account is opened on your 40thbirthday; what is its value on your 68thbirthday?
  4. Change the invested amount to $5000 and answer the questions above.
  5. You want to have $1.5 million in the account on your 68thbirthday. How much would you need to invest at age 18 to reach your goal? Age 30? Age 50?
  6. What would be your advice to anyone wanting to invest for retirement? Why?

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