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How much did the Sarichef Island shrink as a result of the mid-October storm?

How much did the Sarichef Island shrink as a result of the mid-October storm?

Shishmaref, what should have happened to the sea that had not yet happened?

  1. How much did the Sarichef Island shrink as a result of the mid-October storm?
  2. Three specific impacts on the island are ascribed to global warming. Describe the changes to…

a. Seal hunting:

b. Storms:

c. Permafrost:

d. Erosion:

  1. What action did the people take to slow the erosion of their beaches? Was this successful?
  2. What did they do in 2002 to Mina Weyiouanna’s house, to protect it from the eroding shoreline?
  3. What happened in 2000 to Jimmy Nayopuk’s house, which was not moved?

Maldives, an archipelago in peril

  1. What are the Maldivian Islands made of? How did they form?
  2. In addition to flooding from rising sea levels, what other fear do the Maldivian people have for their cities?
  3. List two specific ways that global warming is causing an increase in sea levels.
  4. Mohammed Ali has observed an average of 5 millimeters of sea level rise per year in Mali. At this rate, how much would the ocean rise over the next century?

a. He also states that “…this natural balance is now broken, and that erosion wins out over accretion.” What does he give as the cause of this imbalance?

  1. What impact did the massive El Nino have on the water temperature around the Maldives, and how did this impact the coral?
  2. In the 1980s, the Maldivian government banned coral mining. Explain what they were doing with the mined coral.

Discussion Question

Answer these questions based on what you read, and any additional research you conduct.

How would you define a “climate refugee”?

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Based on the overlap of range zones for these index fossils what is the relative age of the rock

Based on the overlap of range zones for these index fossils what is the relative age of the rock

What index fossils from Figure 8.10 are present?

  1. Based on the overlap of range zones for these index fossils what is the relative age of the rock (expressed as the early, middle, or late part of one or more periods of time)?
  2. Using Figure 8.10, what is the absolute age of the rock in Ma (millions of years old/ago), as a range from oldest to youngest?

Activity 8.5A (Page 223)

A. Refer to the image below, an outcrop in a surface mine (coal strip mine) in northern New Mexico. Note the sill, sedimentary rocks, fault, places where a fossil leaf was found, and isotope data for zircon crystals in the sill.

  1. What is the relative age of the sedimentary rocks in this rock exposure? Explain your reasoning.
  2. What is the absolute age of the sill? Show how you calculated the answer.
  3. Locate the fault. How much displacement has occurred along this fault? ______meters

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Geography (Plate Tectonics) Help!!!

Geography (Plate Tectonics) Help!!!

Hello. I need help with a Geography assignment on Plate Tectonics. I need to have it done tomarrow by 5:00pm.

All of the documents are attached.

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Describe fronts and frontal systems

Describe fronts and frontal systems

using the Google Earth () component.

Key Terms

You should know and understand the following terms:

Air mass

Cold front

Occluded Front

● Continental (c)

Downburst

Stationary Front

● Maritime (m)

Front

Thunderstorm

● Arctic or Antarctic (A)

Mesocyclones

Tropical Cyclones

● Polar (P)

Microburst

Warm Front

● Tropical (T)

Mid-latitude cyclone

Weather

LAB LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After successfully completing this module, you should be able to the following tasks:

● Identify and describe air masses and their associated moisture and temperature conditions

● Describe fronts and frontal systems

● Identify the evolution and migration of a mid-latitude cyclone in the US

● Identify the mechanisms producing thunderstorms, tornados, and hurricanes

● Interpret maps showing the geographical distributions of severe weather systems

2

INTRODUCTION

This lab module explores air masses, fronts and mid-latitude cyclonic weather systems. Topics include the following: continental and maritime air masses; stationary, cold, warm and occluded fronts; and the patterns and processes of mid-latitude cyclones and severe weather storms. The modules start with four opening topics, or vignettes, which are found in the accompanying Google Earth file. These vignettes introduce basic concepts of weather and severe weather systems. Some of the vignettes have animations, videos, or short articles that will provide another perspective or visual explanation for the topic at hand. After reading the vignette and associated links, answer the following questions. Please note that some links might take a while to download based on your Internet speed.

Expand the INTRODUCTION folder and then select Topic 1: Weather.

Read Topic 1: Weather.

Question 1: Briefly describe the likely weather conditions evident in the picture.

A. Sunny and hot

B. Cloudy and raining

C. Warm and humid

D. Hot and hazy

Read Topic 2: Air Masses.

Question 2: The vignette states why there is no mA classification. Additionally, there is no continental equatorial (cE) classification. What is the primary reason that a cE air mass classification does not exist (Hint: it is the opposite reason of mA)?

A. Because equatorial air masses are moist

B. Because continental air masses are moist

C. Because continental air masses originate over land

D. Because there is no land in equatorial regions

Read Topic 3: The Evolution and Weather Conditions of Fronts.

Question 3: Compare the density and speed of cold air (from the cold front) to warm air (from the warm front)

A. Colder air is lighter and travels faster than warm air

B. Colder air is denser and travels faster than warmer air

3

C. Warmer air lighter and travels faster than colder air

D. Warmer air is denser and travels faster than colder air

Read Topic 4: Human Interaction: Tornado Alley.

Question 4: Why do areas located between 30°N to 50°N provide favorable conditions for tornado generation?

A. Because this region is flat

B. Because this region is where cold arctic air and warm subtropical air converge

C. Because this region is predominantly agriculture

D. Because precipitation is needed for agriculture in this region

Collapse and uncheck the INTRODUCTION folder.

4

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

As noted in the vignette, air masses are not randomly distributed across the globe; in fact the geographic origin (source region) of air masses determine each of the six potential air mass types – continental Arctic (cA), continental polar (cP), continental tropical (mT), maritime polar (mP), maritime tropical (mT), and maritime equatorial (mE).

As air masses move around the Earth due to weather conditions, they can gain or lose moisture, or increase or decrease in temperature. For example, a maritime polar (mP) air mass moving across a continent could lose much of its moisture and become a continental polar (cP) air mass.

In this exercise, you will describe the spatial patterns of air masses as they relate to various locations throughout the world.

Verify that Labels (under Borders and Layers) is selected in the Layers panel.

Expand the GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE folder and select the Air Mass folder.

Double-click and select Location A.

Question 5: Identify the principal air mass:

A. mP

B. mT

C. cP

D. cT

Question 6: Identify the air temperature (as very cold, cold, warm, or very warm) and the air humidity (as moist or dry) for the source region of this air mass.

A. Cold and dry

B. Warm and dry

C. Very cold and moist

D. Warm and moist

Double-click and select Location B.

5

Question 7: Identify the principal air mass:

A. mP

B. mT

C. cP

D. cT

Question 8: Identify the air temperature (very cold, cold, warm, or very warm) and the air humidity (moist or dry) for the source region of this air mass.

A. Cold and dry

B. Warm and dry

C. Very cold and moist

D. Warm and moist

Double-click and select Location C

Question 9: Identify the principal air mass:

A. mP

B. mT

C. cP

D. cA

Question 10: Identify the air temperature (very cold, cold, warm, or very warm) and the air humidity (moist or dry) for the source region of this air mass.

A. Cold and dry

B. Warm and dry

C. Cold and moist

D. Warm and moist

Double-click and select Location D.

Question 11: Identify the principal air mass:

A. mP

B. mT

C. cA

D. cT

6

Question12: Identify the air temperature (very cold, cold, warm, or very warm) and the air humidity (moist or dry) for the source region of this air mass.

A. Cold and dry

B. Warm and dry

C. Very cold and dry

D. Warm and moist

Collapse and uncheck the GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE folder.

FRONTS

Fronts are synoptic scale features, meaning they are usually regional or continental in scale, in the order of several hundred to 1000 km (621 miles) or more in length. Synoptic scale weather maps, known as surface weather analysis, use various symbology from known data (pressure, temperature, cloud cover) to determine weather fronts.

On weather maps, the cold front boundary is designated by a blue line of triangle pips, while warm front boundaries are represented by a red line of half-circle pips. Occluded fronts are shown in purple (red+blue) of alternativing triangle and half-circle pips. In all these cases, the side of the line on which the symbol appears indicates the direction of movement of the frontal zone. For stationary fronts, the direction of movement is static, and thus, is represented by the alternation of blue triangles and red half circles shown in opposing directions.

Expand the FRONTS folder.

Select and double-click Cold front.

This symbol depicts a cold front stretching from northern Minnesota to western Nevada.

7

Question 13: In which general direction is the front moving?

A. Northwest

B. Northeast

C. Southwest

D. Southeast

Double-click and select Location E and check Location F.

Question 14: At which location would you expect the air temperature to be warmer?

A. Location E

B. Location F

C. They should be the same temperature

Question 15: Which location would be experiencing thunderstorms?

A. Location E

B. Location F

C. There are thunderstorms at both locations

D. There are not thunderstorms at either location

Uncheck Cold front.

Uncheck Location E.

Double-click and select Warm front.

This symbol depicts a warm front stretching from northern Minnesota to eastern Kentucky.

Check Location G.

Question 16: In which general direction is the front moving?

A. Northwest

B. Northeast

C. Southwest

D. Southeast

Question 17: At which location (F or G) would you expect the air temperature to be warmer?

8

A. Location F

B. Location G

C. They should be the same temperature

Question 18: Would there be rainfall at Location G? If so, briefly describe the intensity (how “hard” it is raining) and duration.

A. No rainfall

B. Rainfall, steady drizzle lasting all day

C. Rainfall, intense rain lasting all day

D. Rainfall, thunderstorms lasting a short period

Collapse and uncheck the FRONTS folder.

MID-LATITUDE CYCLONES

Mid-latitude cyclones are organized low pressure systems that have cold and warm fronts. The development of mid-latitude cyclones is part of the process known as cyclogenesis.

Expand the MID-LATITUDE CYCLONES folder.

Click Migration.

This animation shows the development and migration of a mid-latitude cyclone, as well as satellite imagery (Note: The satellite imagery section might take a few minutes to upload).

Now, you will go through the cyclogenesis of a mid-latitude cyclone on Google Earth.

Return to Google Earth.

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Energy and Macronutrients

Energy and Macronutrients

Using the Nutrition Report above, fill in the Average Eaten columns of Tables 1 and 2 of the file you just opened. To fill in Table 1, Energy and Macronutrients (percent of calories), use the top of the report as shown below. You will need to hover over each macronutrient name to see percent of calories from each. Do NOT use information from the sections that are crossed out on the image below.

For remaining macronutrient components and the micronutrients, use the Nutrition Report tables to obtain the information to fill remaining average intakes for Tables 1 and 2.

Using the screenshot below as an example (vitamins in this case), you will use the 1stcolumn values rather than the red/yellow/green bar values in the 2nd column.

  1. Finish Tables 1 and 2 in the document you downloaded by using the following resources for Target or RDA/AI Nutrient values.

Macronutrients: Use the AMDRs that you learned about in your text for Target values. These can be found in their respective chapters in the text (Chapters 4, 5, and 6).

Micronutrients: Use the link below for RDA/AI values for all vitamins and minerals except Vitamins A and D. For Vitamins A and D, the units from Cronometer do not match the RDA/AI units found in the link below. While this is the most recent publication for RDA/AIs, presently IUs are the preferable measurement for vitamins A and D. As a result, Cronometer provides their results in IUs for these two vitamins. Use the following guidance:

        Vitamin A –     RDA 3000 IU for males

                                RDA 2,333 IU for females

        Vitamin D –     RDA 600 IU for males and females

Recommended Dietary Allowance and Adequate Intakes

Step 4: Analysis Questions

  1. Answer Questions 1- 9 in the file you downloaded above based on your results in Tables 1 and 2. Use complete sentences and ensure proper grammar and spelling.

Step 5: Submission

The following should be submitted as attachments when you have completed this part of your project:

  1. Nutrition Report screen shots (as .doc or .pdf file)
  2. Completed Analysis to include tables and answers to diet analysis questions (found here)

Rubric

–All screenshots were included showing all required Nutrient Report data

–Tables 1 and 2 include all necessary data and are accurately completed

Ques #1

Student has interpreted Mifflin-St Jeor data accurately

–Provides a soundly reasoned comparison of energy needs and calories consumed

–Includes numeric values as part of answers

Ques#2

–EER is calculated correctly

–Unit conversions are accurate

–All calculations are shown

–Accurately compares energy needs and

calories consumed

QUES #3

–Detailed comparison of energy balance results for Mifflin-St Jeor and EER

–Provides a reasonable rationale for choice of best estimate

WRITING:

–Answers are written in student’s own words

–Written in complete sentences

— Demonstrates critical thinking

–No spelling or grammatical errors

–Supported with external research where relevant, cited in APA format

QUES #4

–Student has accurately compares own % calories for carbohydrates, fats, and protein with the AMDRs

–Includes numeric values as part of answers

QUES #5

–RDA for protein is calculated correctly

–All calculations are shown

–Accurately compares protein intake and calculated protein needs

QUES #6

Accurately compares fiber intake with fiber needs recommendations

WRITING:

–Answers are written in student’s own words

–Written in complete sentences

— Demonstrates critical thinking

–No spelling or grammatical errors

–Supported with external research where relevant, cited in APA format

QUES #7

–Student has accurately compares intake of all vitamins and minerals with RDA/AIs

QUES #8

Correctly identified all toxicity risks for nutrient intake above 200%.

Describes diet changes (increase or decrease) to meet recommendations for

–Energy

–Macronutrients

–Micronutrients

–Includes relevant numeric values as part of answers

WRITING:

–Answers are written in student’s own words

–Written in complete sentences

— Demonstrates critical thinking

–No spelling or grammatical errors

–Supported with external research where relevant, cited in APA format

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Geography Essay

Geography Essay

Please checkout the first attachment for what you need do for the essay. For this essay you need to use all attachments to compose the final essay. It’s 3 pages long.

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Week 11: Delivering Lessons Designed for Digital Environments Part of creating a

Week 11: Delivering Lessons Designed for Digital Environments
Part of creating an effective digital learning environment is engaging the learner with well-presented material. Considering your time in this online master’s program, how have you best connected with the material? What aspects of the online environment support your learning style and engage you? As a nurse educator who is also in school, you have the benefit of drawing on both experiences—as an instructor and as a learner—when designing and delivering your own lessons.
Chances are you have had some instruction provided to you via audio and/or video. Perhaps you have even constructed a quick audio or video tutorial to walk a colleague, patient, or other learner through a skill, process, or procedure. Audio and video presentations can be effective tools in presenting content.
Last week, you learned about how to adapt existing content or learning objectives to be used in a digital environment. This week, you explore the methods for delivering lessons online. Specifically, you will have the chance to record your own video, which is a common tool in digital environments. As you explore the materials this week, consider when video lessons and video content would be most effective.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
Develop asynchronous, online, media-based, or virtual learning experiences from the adaptation of classroom or face-to-face lessons
Evaluate video lesson content and delivery
Learning Resources
Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)
Bonnel, W. E., Smith, K. V., & Hober, C. L. (2019).?Teaching technologies in nursing and the health professions: Strategies for engagement, quality, and safety (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Springer.
Chapter 8, “Applied Technologies Assignments: Engaging the Learner for Quality and Safety” (“Technology and Active Learning: Audio and Visual Examples,” pp. 106–109 only)
Credit line: Teaching technologies in nursing and the health professions: Strategies for engagement, quality, and safety, 2nd Edition by Bonnel, W. E., Smith, K. V., & Hober, C. L. Copyright 2019 by Springer Publishing Company. Reprinted by permission of Springer Publishing Company via the Copyright Clearance Center.
Brame, C. J. (2016).?Effective educational videos: Principles?and guidelines for maximizing student learning from video content.?CBE Life Sciences Education, 15(4), es6.?doi:10.1187/cbe.***. Retrieved from?https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5132380/
Frentsos, J. M. (2015). Use of videos as supplemental education tools across the cancer trajectory. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 19(6), E126–130. doi:10.1188/15.CJON.E126-E130
Required Media (click to expand/reduce)
Walden University Academic Skills Center. (2018, April 2).?5 success strategies for filming yourself?[Video file]. Retrieved from?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjhx5ifnbYs?
Note: The approximate length of this video is 29 minutes.
Discussion: Video Lesson
In face-to-face classrooms, content is presented and shared in visual ways, and short introductory videos, recorded responses to discussion posts, or even recorded presentations can help bring this element to a virtual learning environment. Through these methods, educator and students can interact in authentic and exciting ways.
For this Discussion, you will record your own video lesson for a learner group. This Discussion will help you feel comfortable with creating a short recording, both in terms of using technology and being in front of a camera.
Photo Credit: [RGtimeline]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
To Prepare:
Review your Module 5 Assignment and, using your Assignment as a guide, prepare a brief lesson for your learner that you will record.
Access the Kaltura Media guide in the classroom for assistance recording.
By Day 3 of Week 11
Post your 4- to 5-minute recorded lesson on your nursing topic, directed toward your chosen learner group. Along with the recording, post the nursing topic, learner group, and characteristic for your colleagues so they have a better understanding of the context.
View a selection of your colleagues’ video lessons.
By Day 6 of Week 11
Respond to at least two of your colleagues on two different days by providing constructive feedback on their lesson content and delivery as if you were the intended learner. Use the Learning Resources and/or best available evidence from current literature to support your responses.

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Part of creating a appeared first on nursingessayswriter.com.

PLEASE USE CUYAHOGA COUNTY, OHIO, FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT. The primary focus of a co

PLEASE USE CUYAHOGA COUNTY, OHIO, FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT.
The primary focus of a community health nurse is to improve the health of the community. To do this involves using demographic and epidemiological findings to assess the community’s health and diagnose its needs. This assessment is aligned with the module objective “Discuss the elements of practice in community/public health nursing.”
This assignment is not a paper, so there is no cover page. All of the work is completed by completing the attached template. As part of the assignment, you will complete the following tasks: typing data, an analysis of the findings with four (4) references, and community health nursing diagnoses directly on the template.
Compile a range of relevant demographic and epidemiological data found on the community assessment rubric for this assignment. Use the websites listed below, as well as other websites (you can also do a Google search to find the health data you are looking for), gather information about your county and compare it with your state and national numbers.
Example Websites:
Healthy People 2030 – http://www.healthypeople.gov/
U.S. Census Bureau – http://www.census.gov/
Quick Facts – U.S. Census Bureau – https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/PST045216/00
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report – http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – http://www.hhs.gov/
Bureau of Labor Statistics – http://www.bls.gov/
National Center for Health Statistics – http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/
United Way Directory – https://www.unitedway.org/
Visit your local health department’s website for their annual report (some sites provide data by zip code whereas others may not)
World Health Organization Data and Statistics Center – http://www.who.int/healthinfo/statistics/en/
City Data – http://www.city-data.com/
The data you obtain may vary from source to source. **Be sure to include your source/reference!.
Record the most recent data available; the data you record should be dated within the last 5 years;
Complete the assignment using the attached template.
Once you have obtained the required data, in the Analysis Section of the template, write a summary of findings in the space provided. Click on the analysis space and begin typing your summary. Identify actual and at risk health problems from the data that are relevant to your community.
Below the analysis summary formulate 2 (two) community health diagnoses using the data you have collected. Use the Figure 6-3 format in Chapter 6, pp.103 of your textbook.
How your community is doing in comparison with other communities?
References
Minimum of four (4) total references:
– one (1) references from required course materials
– three (3) peer-reviewed references.
IMPORTANT:
All references must be no older than five years (unless making a specific point using a seminal piece of information)
Peer-reviewed references include references from professional data bases such as PubMed or CINHAL applicable to population and practice area, along with evidence based clinical practice guidelines. Examples of unacceptable references are Wikipedia, UpToDate, Epocrates, Medscape, WebMD, hospital organizations, insurance recommendations, & secondary clinical databases.
Style
Unless otherwise specified, all the written assignment must follow APA 7th edition formatting, citations, and references.

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The primary focus of a co appeared first on nursingessayswriter.com.

In order to achieve an action potential, the wave of excitation must be strong e

In order to achieve an action potential, the wave of excitation must be strong enough to carry over the axon hillock, at which point the cell fires at its full force. Cells either fire at full force or don’t fire at all (all or none principle). By the way, although not labeled on the figure above, the axon hillock is located just between the soma and the axon. Think of it as a communication gatekeeper between the soma and the axon, allowing certain messages to pass ***
The inside of the neuron is negatively charged compared to its outside environment (approx. -70mV). This is made true by the special distribution of negatively and positively charged ions. An abundance of organic anions within the cell makes the internal cell environment negatively charged compared to the external environment, where positively charged sodium ions predominate. The process of diffusion and electrostatic pressure play a key role here, and you should read up on these properties if you don’t already understand them (see image below).
Image of ion distribution
The contrast in electrical charge between the inside and outside cell environments enables the cell to work like a battery. In fact, without this charge, the cell is unable to communicate with other cells. If an imbalance in ions occurs, the cell may not be able to maintain its membrane potential. The cell may become unresponsive and stop firing, or it may become too sensitive and fire indiscriminately. Cells could even die. These problems can lead to functional disturbances in the individual including motor dysfunction, paralysis, seizures, hallucinations, etc.
Given the importance of maintaining the appropriate electrical charge, it should now make sense to you why cells expend so much energy even when they are at “rest.” The cell wall must ensure that ions don’t roam about freely. How does the cell membrane do this?
The membranes of neurons and glia cells are composed of a phospholipid bilayer, with hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails and hydrophilic (water-loving) heads. Look at the image above – the tails point inward (pink area).
The “water-fearing” (hydrophobic) tails repel the extracellular fluid, prohibiting the fluid from entering the cell. The resting cell membrane, therefore, is impermeable to most ions. An action potential is required to open special channels embedded in the cell membrane, allowing certain ions to pass ***
During an action potential, special channels open and allow sodium (Na+) ions to rush into the cell, causing the internal charge of the cell to become positive in relation to the outside of the cell. The charge, therefore, is reversed, but only for a millisecond. Potassium (K+) pumps open, allowing potassium to leave the cell, and the charge within the cell begins to become negative again. Sodium-potassium pumps now activate and restore the proper balance of the ions, and the cell repolarizes and returns to resting potential (see graph below).
Displaying graph of action potential.
At what point does an action potential occur?
Dr. Sapolsky explains the role of the axon hillock well. Incoming signals can be thought of as waves of energy, and the axon hillock as a wall. If the wave is small, it swells and slowly dies, but it doesn’t get over the wall, and an action potential is not triggered. If the wave is large, it gets over the hillock and triggers the action potential.
How large does the wave have to be to get past the axon hillock? It depends on the cell. What influences the axon hillock’s threshold? All sorts of things, like experience and learning. Cells become more or less responsive, depending on the situation.
Imagine you’re in a field and feeling very hungry. There are several fruits that are unfamiliar to you, so you taste of a few. You learn that the blue ones are delicious and sweet; the red ones are bitter and disgusting. The next time you’re in this field, which fruit are you likely to eat and which are you likely to avoid? What allowed this learning to take place? Experience, of course. But what did the experience do to your nervous system? You guessed it. It caused your nervous system to change and adapt to the new information. Cells in your visual system changed (you can recognize the fruit by sight); cells in your hippocampus changed (you can recall having eaten these fruits before); cells in your limbic system changed (you certainly had an emotional reaction to eating delicious vs. disgusting fruit, and this memory is now recorded and available); cells in your gustatory and olfactory cortexes changed, etc. These cells, therefore, now react differently when you see these fruits.
Without such changes, we’d be incapable of surviving. If you never learned to fear a saber-toothed tiger, then you’d be eaten alive and would be unable to pass ***

This week we move on to chapter 3, which reviews the structure of the nervous system and its various divisions. Given the visual nature of this information, your task this week is to create a Mind Map of the nervous system. A Mind Map can be useful in learning the location and functions of basic anatomical structures. For those of you who are more visual and/or artistic learners, this is your chance to shine.
The following videos explain how to go about creating a Mind Map along with some examples provided below: the two videos will be sent to you.
As you plan your Mind Map, consider the content below. You don’t have to include all this information in your work, but you should include a comprehensive array of information that will help you accurately map the nervous system and associated functions.
Development of the human brain from prenatal to postnatal development. Include the 3 layers of meninges.
The divisions of the telencephalon. What primary functions are associated with these divisions? What does it mean when we say that a function is lateralized?
The two major structures of the diencephalon. What important functions do they subserve?
Describe the two major structures of the midbrain and the two major structures of the hindbrain. Explain what important functions they subserve.
Describe the peripheral nervous system. Compare the functions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system.
NOTE: While you may use the internet for templates and images to help create your Mind Map, you are expected to do a substantial portion of the work by hand!
Please be thorough and present the information in an organized, concise fashion. Take a picture or scan your Mind Map;
below are the two videos

also here you will find some pictures
Body Systems
https://healthyheels.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/body-systems.png
Health
https://www.mini-abraham.com/philosophy?lightbox=c40e
Meningitis
https://www.myfinalsnotes.com/meningitis.html
Science of Breath

Mind Mapping

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