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Lesson 4

Lesson 4

Answer Questions attached

it was said , read the text :
The Man Who Would Be King Pages 13-25
by Rudyard Kipling

The Kumharsen Serai is the great four-square
sink of humanity where the strings
of camels and horses from the North load
and unload. All the nationalities of Central
Asia may be found there, and most of the
folk of India proper. Balkh and Bokhara
there meet Bengal and Bombay, and try to
draw eye-teeth. You can buy ponies, turquoises,
Persian pussy-cats, saddle-bags, fat-tailed
sheep and musk in the Kumharsen
Serai, and get many strange things for
nothing. In the afternoon I went down
there to see whether my friends intended to
keep their word or were lying about drunk.
A priest attired in fragments of ribbons
and rags stalked up to me, gravely twisting
a child’s paper whirligig. Behind him was
his servant, bending under the load of a
crate of mud toys. The two were loading
up two camels, and the inhabitants of the
Serai watched them with shrieks of laughter.
“The priest is mad,” said a horse-dealer to
me. “He is going up to Kabul to sell toys
to the Amir. He will either be raised to
honor or have his head cut off. He came
in here this morning and has been behaving
madly ever since.”
“The witless are under the protection of
God,” stammered a flat-cheeked Usbeg in
broken Hindi. “They foretell future events.”
“Would they could have foretold that my
caravan would have been cut up by the
Shinwaris almost within shadow of the
Pass!” grunted the Eusufzai agent of a Rajputana
trading-house whose goods had been
feloniously diverted into the hands of other
robbers just across the Border, and whose
misfortunes were the laughing-stock of the
bazar. “Ohé, priest, whence come you and
whither do you go?”
“From Roum have I come,” shouted the
priest, waving his whirligig; “from Roum,
blown by the breath of a hundred devils
across the sea! O thieves, robbers, liars,
the blessing of Pir Khan on pigs, dogs, and
perjurers! Who will take the Protected of
God to the North to sell charms that are
never still to the Amir? The camels shall
not gall, the sons shall not fall sick, and the
wives shall remain faithful while they are
away, of the men who give me place in
their caravan. Who will assist me to slipper
the King of the Roos with a golden slipper
with a silver heel? The protection of Pir
Kahn be upon his labors!” He spread out
the skirts of his gaberdine and pirouetted between
the lines of tethered horses.
“There starts a caravan from Peshawar to
Kabul in twenty days, Huzrut,” said the
Eusufzai trader. “My camels go therewith.
Do thou also go and bring us good luck.”
“I will go even now!” shouted the priest.
“I will depart upon my winged camels,
and be at Peshawar in a day! Ho! Hazar
Mir Khan,” he yelled to his servant “drive
out the camels, but let me first mount my
own.”
He leaped on the back of his beast as it
knelt, and turning round to me, cried:—
“Come thou also, Sahib, a little along the
road, and I will sell thee a charm—an amulet
that shall make thee King of Kafiristan.”
Then the light broke upon me, and I followed
the two camels out of the Serai till we
reached open road and the priest halted.
“What d’ you think o’ that?” said he in
English. “Carnehan can’t talk their patter,
so I’ve made him my servant. He makes a
handsome servant. ’Tisn’t for nothing that
I’ve been knocking about the country for
fourteen years. Didn’t I do that talk neat?
We’ll hitch on to a caravan at Peshawar till
we get to Jagdallak, and then we’ll see if we
can get donkeys for our camels, and strike
into Kafiristan. Whirligigs for the Amir,
O Lor! Put your hand under the camel-bags
and tell me what you feel.”
I felt the butt of a Martini, and another
and another.
“Twenty of ’em,” said Dravot, placidly.
“Twenty of ’em, and ammunition to correspond,
under the whirligigs and the mud
dolls.”
“Heaven help you if you are caught with
those things!” I said. “A Martini is worth
her weight in silver among the Pathans.”
“Fifteen hundred rupees of capital—every
rupee we could beg, borrow, or steal—are
invested on these two camels,” said Dravot.
“We won’t get caught. We’re going through
the Khaiber with a regular caravan. Who’d
touch a poor mad priest?”
“Have you got everything you want?”
I asked, overcome with astonishment.
“Not yet, but we shall soon. Give us a
momento of your kindness, Brother. You
did me a service yesterday, and that time in
Marwar. Half my Kingdom shall you have,
as the saying is.” I slipped a small charm
compass from my watch-chain and handed
it up to the priest.
“Good-by,” said Dravot, giving me his
hand cautiously. “It’s the last time we’ll
shake hands with an Englishman these many
days. Shake hands with him, Carnehan,”
he cried, as the second camel passed me.
Carnehan leaned down and shook hands.
Then the camels passed away along the dusty
road, and I was left alone to wonder. My
eye could detect no failure in the disguises.
The scene in the Serai attested that they
were complete to the native mind. There
was just the chance, therefore, that Carnehan
and Dravot would be able to wander
through Afghanistan without detection.
But, beyond, they would find death, certain
and awful death.
Ten days later a native friend of mine,
giving me the news of the day from Peshawar,
wound up his letter with:—“There has
been much laughter here on account of a
certain mad priest who is going in his estimation
to sell petty gauds and insignificant
trinkets which he ascribes as great charms
to H. H. the Amir of Bokhara. He passed
through Peshawar and associated himself to
the Second Summer caravan that goes to
Kabul. The merchants are pleased because
through superstition they imagine that such
mad fellows bring good-fortune.”
The two then, were beyond the Border.
I would have prayed for them, but, that
night, a real King died in Europe, and demanded
an obituary notice.
* * * * * * * *
The wheel of the world swings through
the same phases again and again. Summer
passed and winter thereafter, and came and
passed again. The daily paper continued
and I with it, and upon the third summer
there fell a hot night, a night-issue, and a
strained waiting for something to be telegraphed
from the other side of the world,
exactly as had happened before. A few great
men had died in the past two years, the machines
worked with more clatter, and some
of the trees in the Office garden were a few
feet taller. But that was all the difference.
I passed over to the press-room, and went
through just such a scene as I have already
described. The nervous tension was stronger

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What If We’re Wrong About What’s Wrong With Argument

What If We’re Wrong About What’s Wrong With Argument

please answer the following:

First, according to the Eubanks piece, “What If We’re Wrong About What’s Wrong With Argument”(file uploaded) what is “wrong” with public argument?
Eubanks lists at least three features central to “nonproductive” argument. Be sure to list the three, and for each, as always, provide textual support to help clarify what Eubanks means. (e.g. “On page 3 Eubanks writes…”)
Second, how does the internet/digital/multimedia format of public arguments contribute to these problems?
Please try to use insight about internet arguments from “This Video Will Make You Angry” Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rE3j_RHkqJc – as well as Ch. 16 from EAA and your own understanding of and experience with digital media (including social media)!
(Look for chapter 16 in the textbook I uploaded)

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experience with digital media

experience with digital media

please answer the following:

First, according to the Eubanks piece, “What If We’re Wrong About What’s Wrong With Argument”(file uploaded) what is “wrong” with public argument?
Eubanks lists at least three features central to “nonproductive” argument. Be sure to list the three, and for each, as always, provide textual support to help clarify what Eubanks means. (e.g. “On page 3 Eubanks writes…”)
Second, how does the internet/digital/multimedia format of public arguments contribute to these problems?
Please try to use insight about internet arguments from “This Video Will Make You Angry” Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rE3j_RHkqJc – as well as Ch. 16 from EAA and your own understanding of and experience with digital media (including social media)!
(Look for chapter 16 in the textbook I uploaded)

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social media

social media

please answer the following:

First, according to the Eubanks piece, “What If We’re Wrong About What’s Wrong With Argument”(file uploaded) what is “wrong” with public argument?
Eubanks lists at least three features central to “nonproductive” argument. Be sure to list the three, and for each, as always, provide textual support to help clarify what Eubanks means. (e.g. “On page 3 Eubanks writes…”)
Second, how does the internet/digital/multimedia format of public arguments contribute to these problems?
Please try to use insight about internet arguments from “This Video Will Make You Angry” Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rE3j_RHkqJc – as well as Ch. 16 from EAA and your own understanding of and experience with digital media (including social media)!
(Look for chapter 16 in the textbook I uploaded)

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One Project (4 Pages) & One Draft

One Project (4 Pages) & One Draft

Major Writing Project 2: Entering a Conversation (4 pages)

Instructions: Choose one of the sets of essays listed below (Carr and Thompson together make up a “set,” etc.). Your essay should include summaries of both of the authors’ arguments (“they say”); your argument should point out how the authors agree and disagree; and your argument should include your own response to the issues the two essays raise (“I say”). The “I say” is your own argument concerning the issues.

  • Make sure you include a naysayer to show possible objections to your own argument, and address the “so what” factor: why do
  • Make sure you use proper formatting (MLA or APA style, double-spaced, Times or Times New Roman font, 12 point, paragraphs indented).
  • Make sure you have a proper heading at the top of the first page (name, etc.)
  • Your paper should be about 4 pages.
  • Plagiarism will not be tolerated.
  • I recommend you take a look at the Grading Guide (below), which explains how I will grade your papers.

Recommended structure: For this paper you have four pages to work with and you need to include, in effect, five major parts:

  1. Introduction: includes basic information about authors (brief), a very brief summary of authors’ ideas (a sentence or two), a brief statement of your argument or thesis statement (a sentence or two), and a brief explanation of why your argument matters (a sentence or two)
  2. Summary of 2 authors, with quotes as evidence
  3. Summary of how they agree/disagree; provide quotes if necessary
  4. Your own opinion and your reasons for your opinion (which includes at least one naysayer); provide quotes as evidence
  5. Conclusion: includes a return sentence, a restatement of your argument, and a developed explanation of why your argument matters

Note that those are five parts, not paragraphs (exceptions: the introduction and the conclusion are usually one paragraph each). What could this look like? Here’s an example: After the brief introductory paragraph (where you introduce your topic, basic information about your authors with brief summaries of authors’ ideas, a sense of your argument and perhaps why your argument matters), you might have a summary of one author (1 paragraph), then a summary of the second author (1 paragraph). Then you might have one paragraph that explains how they agree or disagree (though you can already allude to that in the summary paragraphs through phrases like “Unlike Turkle, Wortham asserts that…”). Note that the paragraph that explains how the two authors agree or disagree is still “they say,” since you’re not yet putting forward your own opinion on the issues. At that point you’ll have written about 2 pages. Then you write your own argument (“I say”) in relation to what they say (about a page and a half). At that point you’ve written about 3.5 pages. Then you end with one short concluding paragraph, where you wrap it up with a return sentence and again explain why it matters.

Keep in mind: this way of structuring this assignment is only a suggestion; it doesn’t have to be exactly like that. But hopefully this gives you an idea of what this kind of paper could look like.

Sets

Set 1: Nicholas Carr, “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”

Clive Thompson, “Smarter than You Think: How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Better”

Set 2: Sherry Turkle, “No Need to Call”

Jenna Wortham, “I Had a Nice Time with You Tonight. On the App.”

Set 3: Michaela Cullington, “Does Texting Affect Writing?”

Malcolm Gladwell, “Small Change: Why the Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted”

Grading Guide: I will use the following grading guide to grade your papers. Think of it as a “cheat sheet,” but without the “cheating” part. It’ll help you figure out how to get a good grade on MWP 2.

Introduction (10 points)

Includes basic information about the authors as well as the full titles of essays; includes a brief summary statement about essays; includes a clear thesis statement (summary of “I say” in relation to “They Say”).

“They say” inhabits world-view of each author (20 points)

Each summary does not agree or disagree with author (summary inhabits worldview of author); each summary uses sophisticated signal verbs to summarize author’s points; no listing of author’s points or “closest cliché” (pp. 31, 35, 33)

Quoting: Uses quotes correctly and appropriately (20 points)

Quotes used to present “proof of evidence” (p. 43) in summary of authors’ arguments — Quotes should not be “orphans” (p. 44) — Quotes should be framed appropriately (“quotation sandwich”) (p. 47) — Quotes should be Introduced with appropriate verb (p. 48) – Indicates page number of quote (p. 49)

“I say” clearly agrees, disagrees, or combination of agrees and disagrees (20 points)

Clear “I say” statement in introduction, placed in relation to authors – Clear statements of agreement, disagreement, or both (use at least one template per author on pp. 58, 60, 62-65) – Clearly distinguishes “they say” from “I say” – Clearly signals who is saying what: Uses at least one template from pp. 70-74 – “I say” includes clear reasons for argument that are not simply summaries of authors’ arguments – Clearly plants naysayer to support “I say” argument (use at least one template from pp. 81, 82,83-84, 88).

Clearly states why the argument matters (10 points)

Uses at least one “who cares?” template from pp. 94-95; Uses at least one “so what?” template from pp. 97-98, 100 — statement why argument matters should be included in either introductory paragraph or concluding paragraph (or both)

Conclusion (10 points)

Includes at least one “return sentence” in the conclusion to remind reader of what “they say” (p. 27-28); includes a restatement of thesis or “I say”

Editing and tone (10 points)

No editing errors (spelling, grammar, punctuation, and formatting); Uses proper tone (formal where appropriate, informal where appropriate)

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300 Word Response

300 Word Response

please answer the following:

First, according to the Eubanks piece, “What If We’re Wrong About What’s Wrong With Argument”(file uploaded) what is “wrong” with public argument?
Eubanks lists at least three features central to “nonproductive” argument. Be sure to list the three, and for each, as always, provide textual support to help clarify what Eubanks means. (e.g. “On page 3 Eubanks writes…”)
Second, how does the internet/digital/multimedia format of public arguments contribute to these problems?
Please try to use insight about internet arguments from “This Video Will Make You Angry” Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rE3j_RHkqJc – as well as Ch. 16 from EAA and your own understanding of and experience with digital media (including social media)!
(Look for chapter 16 in the textbook I uploaded)

The post 300 Word Response appeared first on superioressaypapers.

thesis statement.

thesis statement.

Paper 1 turns out to be five paragraphs in length, with the three body paragraphs written with 20 sentences each. That means that the body paragraphs will be 20 sentences long, or a total of 60 sentences. The opening and closing paragraphs will be about five or so sentences in length.

The paper has quotes, with in-text citations and a works cited page.

You will need a citation for everything that you quote. This will be an individual choice.

For example, someone will want to quote from Democracy in America by De Toqueville. Someone will quote from Martin Luther King, Jr. Someone will quote from J. Meachem’s article about the American dream that is found in Modules If you quote or reference them, you will need a signal phrase, a MLA in-text citation, and a reference in the Works Cited page.

Everyone must have at least two quotes from the novel with signal phrases, MLA in-text citation formatting, and a MLA-formatted Works Cited page as the last page of their papers.

Go to Assignments to turn in your paper on time.

6.5. Module 6.5: Sample Paper

Instructions: See this sample paper as an example only. It is not perfect, of course, but it does address most of the E101 formal exposition requirements that are listed in Modules Paper 1, Evaluation Criteria in Modules, and Assignments Paper 1.

COMMENTS

What needs to be done here is to use “First,” for the first 5-paragraph segment of Paper 2. Then use “Second,” for the second 5-paragraph segment. The second segment of the paper is new and is developed by cause and effect. It should have three characters and it should describe the effect of the dream on each one. The first segment, of course, is an edited version of the first paper, Paper 1. So you will notice that this paper is really just a new version of Paper 1, and it never really devotes three full paragraphs on the effects of dream on characters.

Billy Grubstake

Professor Sprague

English 101

February 2009

                                     Gatsby and the Subjective American Dream

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby can be seen as a multi-perspective exploration of he American ream with varying ideas of what that dream can mean. this thesis lacks clarity about the values of the thesis in terms of the American dream and the novel…the novel is about tragedy, but this essay’s topic sentence mistakenly pretends that the tone may be neutral…the novel ends in tragedy, so the thesis statement must communicate that tragedy somehow…The dream that has been labeled uniquely American is a subjective concept, an idea open to interpretation and based on one’s own background and personal aspirations. In The Great Gatsby, the backdrop of early 20th century America serves as an environment for exploring the dream. Further, the individual characters of the novel demonstrate different facets of that ‘dream’.

First, why and how this universal and fluid concept of human striving for potential and contentment became American is up for discussion and perhaps could be rooted in Thomas Jefferson’s famously celebrated words that help make up part of the theme that is the American constitution; that elusive concept of the pursuit of happiness. topic sentence should be simpler THEN follow with discussion…While happiness itself is not, and cannot, be guaranteed, the freedom to pursue it is held as the high ideal for the state to base its own self-creation on. What is happiness anyway? Obviously for some it is more complex than for others. It could be wealth, fame, or social success. It could be a simple life free from unnecessary hardship. It could be owning a home or a business. It could be falling in love and having a secure life partner. It could be going to college, finding spiritual enlightenment, having children, etc. What it means is less relevant than having the freedom to pursue it. What makes America unique is that it is the only country founded on an idea, as opposed to nationality based on geography or ethnicity. The idea is freedom. Individual freedom that is a God given birthright is set to law in the American constitution. Perhaps this is the big reason for the dream having been titled American. Admittedly, it has taken centuries for this to actually manifest itself in a truly credible way. Jefferson himself was a slave owner who wrote of the black man’s inferiority to white men, even while stating the “All men are created equal.” needs a citation…For this to maintain substance, it cannot be applied selectively to only white men. Women and minorities must be included or the foundation is weakened with a double standard and hypocrisy. It took literally centuries of progress, from women’s rights to civil rights and now to our first black president. But even with all this progress, there is still work to do and a perpetual evolution to be had. Perhaps the dream can exist precisely because it is in its very nature to be free to find evolution without a dogmatic ideological barrier of laws that would permanently prevent this American dream, the pursuit of happiness, from growing and finding its home in the heart of American citizens and of those around the world who admire and respect it.

Second, The Great Gatsby explores different dimensions why different as opposed to all negative…again, the topic sentence pretends a neutrality when the writer should acknowledge that this is a discussion of a tragedy…of this American dream. As the story progresses we see how the dream is subverted by those who seem to possess all the elements integral to the dream, not the least of which is material wealth. For most the dream is something that is pursued, but never attained. For those with wealth, the dream’s promise of happiness is squandered and corrupted with greed, vanity and narcissism. The overall essence of the novel is tragic in that the higher ideals of the American dream are subverted by those who, even with all the elements seemingly in place, still thwart their own potential happiness. One could have health, wealth and a loving spouse, but still find discontentment and misery. Perhaps it is truly a matter of perspective in that those whose wealth is inherited, never experienced the pains and trials of poverty and therefore never learned appreciation, which in itself breeds discontentment. It seems the pursuit of the dream can bring more happiness than the attainment. And when finally attained, happiness is still elusive in the absence of healthy relationships. In a counter-intuitive way, this can be viewed as something positive and inspirational in the sense that we can let go of what we think will bring us happiness, (i.e. – material wealth), in light of the knowledge of those whose wealth not only can fail to bring happiness, but often brings it’s own source of misery. It is a classic assessment of the painful realities of capitalism as it relates to the American dream. In the capitalistic culture, competition and domination are valued over more down to earth human virtues. We as humans tend to forget the things that can truly bring happiness and get caught up in the sacrificial culture, where failure to succeed is seen as weakness and those who play the game differently are outcasts. Even the rich segregate themselves in terms of old and new, with the old rich looking down on the new rich as somehow uncultivated and as primitive as the impoverished culture from whence they came. What we see in the novel is how the old rich subvert the dream with their own aristocratic discontentment and show little interest allowing the dream to manifest for those who aren’t already in their bubble like subculture. This is actually a complete 180-degree subversion of the dream in that a major component in the dream should be the reality that anyone can achieve it. As Jefferson wrote, “All men are created equal…” from which one would conclude that for the dream to exist, it becomes contingent on whether the dream is truly and equally available to all, not just the privileged few.

Third, three characters in the novel, Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, and Tom Buchanan, each bring a different …it is not about “different,” but about variates on tragic or negative…example of the dissatisfaction that can come from the subversions of the dream. Set in the roaring twenties, the characters interact in the culture of that day, attending parties, speak-easy’s, and getting rich quick. The ideology of capitalism begun to run amuck is the template from which this story takes us in and out of perceptions of the American dream. Our narrator Nick Carraway speaks in retrospect of his perception of Jay Gatsby’s, stating, “What fowl dust float in the wake his dreams” (6). Gatsby serves the point and embodies the contradiction between his own dream and the dream of his society. Gatsby throw huge parties he doesn’t even go to, saying he doesn’t like parties. His own desire for love is independent of his wealth. Perhaps this can suggest that the dream is meant to be more than material wealth, at least for Gatsby. Nick Carraway begins his summer in hopeful and excited optimism only to conclude the season in bitter disillusionment. His experience in high society exposes him to the emptiness that lies at the heart of the corruption. The capitalistic excesses are perverting the dream that at once is the fuel which propels the dream forth in the first place. As he witnesses his cousin’s husband, Tom Buchanan swimming in his blatant and shameless improprieties, the seeds of Nick’s cynicism are sewn. And with Buchanan, the archetypical rich kid and self-serving narcissist displays the ultimate perversion of the dream, rife with racism and aristocratic pompousness. He pays ten dollars for a dog and tells the dog seller to go buy ten more, seemingly annoyed with the very capitalistic ideology that serves his own every whim. In summary, defining the American dream can be an endeavor that is perhaps only fulfilled in accepting plurality. Ultimately, happiness is subjective and a personal responsibility, and with the pursuit of it guaranteed in our American constitution, the soil is fertile for the cultivation of this idea of the American dream. In The Great Gatsby, we see the darker shades and hear a potential death knell rung from the hands of uncontrolled capitalism, and can take away many things, including a warning for our own time. The dream is different for everyone. And the sad reality is that, the American constitution notwithstanding, as Nick Carraway’s father told him, “…all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had” (1). As much as we want to believe in the equality of human beings, ultimately that ideal is ultimately thwarted in favor of self-serving ideologies.

Works Cited

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1995.

                                                                                 Outline

I. THESIS: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby can be seen as a multi-perspective exploration of the American dream’with varying ideas of what that dream can mean.

II. First, why and how this universal and fluid concept of human striving for potential and contentment became American is up for discussion and perhaps could be rooted in Thomas Jefferson’s famously celebrated words that help make up part of the theme that is the American constitution; that elusive concept of the pursuit of happiness.

III. Second, The Great Gatsby explores different dimensions of this American dream. As the story progresses we see how the dream is subverted by those who seem to possess all the elements integral to the dream, not the least of which is material wealth.

IV. Third, three characters in the novel, Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, and Tom Buchanan, each brings a different example of the dissatisfaction that can come from the subversions of the dream.

V. In summary, defining the American dream can be an endeavor that is perhaps only fulfilled in accepting plurality.needs to be the conclusion

6.6. Module 6.6: Sample Paper

Instructions: Here is a second sample Paper 1.

                                                                                                                                                                  Chandler 1

Esmeralda Chandler

Professor Sprague

English 101, Paper 1, Section #8044

27 February 2009

                                                       Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Wealthtitle does not hint at the thesis...

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby brings to light the tragic corruption of the American dream through the pursuit of pleasure and wealth at any cost. The American dream was an idea that started with our founding fathers when they wrote the Declaration of Independence. In the novel, we see how this idea has been twisted into a misshapen version of the original idea through greed and decayed morals. Then, through the eyes of Fitzgerald’s characters, we will gain learn that money cannot buy our dreams, no matter how much of it one might have. We live in different economical times, but it doesn’t take being fabulously wealthy to lose sight of the true meaning of our dreams.

First, the original idea of the American dream was thought to be based on the pursuit of happiness. The phrase “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” outlines every Americans’ idea of success needs an in-text citation. Our founding fathers unknowingly conceived the American dream when they wrote the Declaration of Independence. In his book The American Dream: A Short History of an Idea That Shaped a Nation, Jim Cullen explains “These words speak to us. It’s not only that they laid the foundations for sweeping social movements like the struggle to end slavery. . . . These words actually structure the minutiae of everyday existence: where we go to school, who we marry, what we buy”(38). When these words were penned, they were in a document that freed us from another country and made us citizens of our own nation and not immigrants to a new land. These words are what drive immigrants here to find new opportunities. Immigrants come to America with dreams of rising above racial and social boundaries to become wealthy and successful. In the early part of the 20th century, immigrants would come to Ellis Island by the boat loads and stand in lines just for the chance to raise their families free from poverty and political persecution. They came here dreaming of the streets being paved in gold and of opportunities abound for their children. Today, the American dream has been greatly mutated into a power hungry pursuit of money and pleasure. Big business rules the land and the cost of living is so high that we’re forced to dream of having more money to lead a better life. American historian James Truslow Adams once wrote in his book The Epic of America, “But there has also been the American Dream, that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for every man, with opportunity for each according to his ability or achievement. It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of a social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position”(404). According to Adams, we should all have the chance to achieve what we are capable of, and not just strive for materialistic pursuits. The Epic of America was written in 1931, during a time of economical depression. This may have been a time when many Americans dreamed of having more money to attain happiness. We are once again in an economical depression, and we find ourselves even more obsessed with the quickest way to pursue a dollar. America was the land of opportunity, but ultimately has corrupted the pursuit of happiness with illusions of grandeur. Americans want it all and they want it now. We are no longer willing to work for it; we want it handed to us and expect our dreams to come to us.

                                                                                                                                                                       Chandler 2

Second, Fitzgerald explores the corruption of the American dream through the lives of various characters obsession with wealth and pleasure. In the novel, we catch a glimpse into the lives of the wealthy, and we see how their riches do not enrich their lives. The rich and beautiful are just as miserable as the poor and downtrodden. The American dream, as seen through Fitzgerald’s eyes, has decayed into materialism and a loss of values. Many of the characters in this novel spend their money on possessions and glamorous parties to bring meaning to their lives. Their lives are empty and lack a purpose. One example of this is Tom and Daisy’s child. Tom and Daisy are main characters in the novel, yet we only hear mention of their child a couple of times throughout the novel. In the first chapter of The Great Gatsby, Daisy reminisces about the birth of her little girl. To portray to the reader how jaded her view of the world has become she relates this quote: “I’m glad it’s a girl. And I hope she’ll be a fool-that’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool” (17). It shows that people can have all they think they have ever dreamed, and realize that they would not wish these things on their children. Wealth cannot overcome the corruption of the American dream as portrayed by the separation of old and new money. While Daisy and Tom are example of East Egg residents or “old money”, on the other side of the bay lies West Egg or “new money”. The economy was booming in 1922 and the opportunity to make money was on the rise. The more money people made, the more they spent and the more they expected to come to them. It became an endless cycle of materialism and greed. The new money was good example of this. They had acquired their money through this booming economy, either through the stock market, or possibly more illicit ways such as bootlegging. They tended to be ostentatious with their money, buying the biggest houses and flaunting their money in front of everyone. The old money looked down upon this, seeing the new money as a lower class of being. So even though the West Eggers have achieved their dreams of gaining riches and buying big homes and spending lavish amounts of money, they were still spurned within their social class as being lower class. They were looked down upon by the East Eggers. Yet both sides of the bays, old and new money, expected every opportunity afforded to them through their great wealth. The characters in the novel have come to expect their dreams to come to them. Most working class citizens understand the value of a dollar. They’ve worked hard for that dollar and they will work hard for their dreams. In the novel we are faced with a different breed of American citizen. The upper class American. The old money had everything handed to them, from money to their property to their educations. They do not understand a day’s hard work. Many opportunities open themselves to people with money, especially those who have a name behind that money, and old money has both of those things. The new money came about because of the growth of the economy. They may understand how hard it is to earn something you work for, but money corrupts. They have what they want, and now they want their dreams to com

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describe her as the pictures do?

describe her as the pictures do?

The Scarlet Letter

Reading: Chapter 1-4 ( Skip “The custom House” Chapter)

Do an image search of “Scarlet Letter” or “Hester Prynne.” Choose three differents images of hester and write a page or so explainning the meanings behind the pictures. What aspects of her personality do these artists and models seem to be most interested in? What passages from the first four chapters seem to describe her as the pictures do?

Please find the PDF file of the book below

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explaining the effect of the characteristics on the story

explaining the effect of the characteristics on the story

Assignment “Rip Van Winkle” and the Emergence of an American Mythology This document provides an overview of the tasks and time line for completing this assignment.

Assignment Instructions As you have learned, the stories that make up a nation’s mythology share several characteristics:

• They are set in the past, often in remote or exciting places and times. • They are filled with remarkable, strange, or exaggerated characters. • They feature incredible, heroic, impressive, magical, or mysterious events and their consequences. • They convey a positive message about a nation or its people.

After reading Washington Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle,” consider it as a story that helped create an American mythology. Then answer the following question in the form of a short essay. Your essay should consist of at least five paragraphs: an introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph. How does Irving incorporate at least three of the above characteristics into “Rip Van Winkle”? What is the impact of these characteristics on the story or on the reader’s experience of the story? Be sure to cite specific examples from the text in your response. Process You should always use a process for your writing that includes planning and drafting. To complete this assignment, you will do the following: • Review the assignment instructions and grading criteria thoroughly. The writing assignment you complete in

this unit will be graded against a rubric that assesses the essay in a number of categories. These categories focus both on the essay’s contents and its clarity.

o Read the rubric on the last page of this document. Keep the criteria listed on the rubric in mind as you complete the writing assignment.

o Remember to write in standard formal English and use the third person (no personal opinions) and the present tense.

• Read and study “Rip Van Winkle” by Washington Irving. As you study the work, you will gather information and

start to plan your approach to the essay. • Complete a plan for your essay. • Begin drafting your paper, using your plan as a guide. • Review and revise your first draft. You should try to have another person read your work and give you

feedback as part of your revision process. • Write the final draft of your project. Be sure to follow these requirements and recommendations when

completing your draft: Open a new Microsoft Word document. Type your name, your teacher’s name, your school name, and the date at the top of your document. To help your teacher know from whom the project came, save the file as: ENG303A/ENG304A_04_01_Rip_Van_Winkle_Essay_FirstInitial_LastName.doc

Example: ENG303A/ENG304A_04_01_Rip_Van_Winkle_Essay_M_Smith.doc

Type your project in the document you create.

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Graded Assignment ENG303A/ENG304A: American Literature | Unit 4 | Lesson 1: Creating an American Mythology – Introduction

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Time Line You will complete this project over the course of eight school days.

Task Start Complete Print and review assignment instructions. Day 26 Day 26

Read and study “Rip Van Winkle.” Day 26 Day 28

Complete a plan for your essay. Day 28 Day 29

Draft and revise your essay. Confer with your teacher if necessary.

Day 29 Day 33

Submit final draft for a grade. Day 33

Grading/Point Values Assignment Point Value: 200

Required Final Draft Length Pages: 1–2

Word Count: 250–500

Graded Assignment Answer Key ENG303A/ENG304A: American Literature | Unit 4 | Lesson 1: Creating an American Mythology – Introduction

“Rip Van Winkle” and the Emergence of an American Mythology Grading Rubric 5 4 3 2 1 Criterion

Purpose The literary essay fulfills its purpose of explaining how “Rip Van Winkle” reflects the emergence of an American mythology. The essay contains a complete analysis of the characteristics and explains how these characteristics affect the story and the reader’s experience of the story.

The literary essay explains how “Rip Van Winkle” reflects the emergence of an American mythology, but the analysis of the characteristics is not complete. The essay presents more summary than analysis. The writer’s appreciation of how the characteristics affect the story and the reader’s experience is not always clear.

The purpose of the literary essay about “Rip Van Winkle” and the emergence of an American mythology is not entirely clear. The essay provides some analysis of the characteristics, but there are significant gaps that leave the reader questioning. The writer may or may not explain how the characteristics affect the story and the reader’s experience. The essay contains irrelevant information, which makes the reader question the main purpose of the essay.

The literary essay about “Rip Van Winkle” and the emergence of an American mythology does not fulfill its purpose because it lacks significant analysis of the characteristics, or contains irrelevant information, or is mostly a summary of the story.

This essay is not a literary essay about “Rip Van Winkle” and the emergence of an American mythology. It does not contain an analysis of the story’s characteristics, and it does not convey the writer’s understanding of the story, the characteristics, and the effect of those characteristics on the reader.

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Graded Assignment Answer Key ENG303A/ENG304A: American Literature | Unit 4 | Lesson 1: Creating an American Mythology – Introduction

5 4 3 2 1 Criterion Ideas and Content

The literary essay presents a valid thesis and contains examples of three of the four characteristics of stories that participate in a nation’s mythology:

The literary essay does not present a valid thesis, and the writer discusses only one of the specified characteristics. The writer is unable to make convincing connections between the analysis of the characteristics and the emergence of an American mythology. The writer does not use paraphrases, examples from the story, or quotations to support his or her analysis. The writer draws conclusions for which he or she offers no evidence. The writer does not explain the effect of the characteristics on the story or the reader, and the essay presents more summary than analysis.

The literary essay does not have a valid thesis, and the writer does not discuss the characteristics. The essay shows no insight into the story and its contribution to an American mythology and does not use any paraphrases, quotations, or examples from the story to support an analysis of the story’s effect on the reader and its contribution to an American mythology.

The literary essay presents a valid thesis and contains examples of three of the four characteristics of stories that participate in a nation’s mythology:

The literary essay presents a valid thesis and contains examples of fewer than three of the four characteristics of stories that participate in a nation’s mythology:

• They are set in the past, often in remote or exciting places and times.

• They are set in the past, often in remote or exciting places and times.

• They are set in the past, often in remote or exciting places and times.

• They are filled with remarkable, strange, or exaggerated characters.

• They are filled with remarkable, strange, or exaggerated characters.

• They are filled with remarkable, strange, or exaggerated characters.

• They feature incredible, heroic, impressive, magical, or mysterious events and their consequences.

• They feature incredible, heroic, impressive, magical, or mysterious events and their consequences.

• They feature incredible, heroic, impressive, magical, or mysterious events and their consequences.

• They convey a positive message about a nation or its people.

• They convey a positive message about a nation or its people.

• They convey a positive message about a nation or its people.

The three chosen characteristics are clearly supported by evidence in the form of relevant paraphrases, quotations, and examples from the story. The writer explains the connections between the evidence and the creation of an American mythology. The writer concludes by explaining the effect of the characteristics on the story and on the reader.

The three characteristics are mostly supported by relevant paraphrases and quotations from the story. The writer explains the connections between the evidence and the creation of an American mythology, but some points remain unsupported, or the writer does not make a convincing connection between evidence presented and conclusions drawn. The writer concludes by explaining the effect of the characteristics on the story and on the reader.

The characteristics are sometimes, but not always, supported by relevant paraphrases and quotations from the story. The essay includes some irrelevant or tangential content. The writer does not always explain the connections between the evidence presented and the creation of an American mythology. The writer may fail to conclude by explaining the effect of the characteristics on the story and on the reader, or the essay may offer more summary than analysis.

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Graded Assignment Answer Key ENG303A/ENG304A: American Literature | Unit 4 | Lesson 1: Creating an American Mythology – Introduction

5 4 3 2 1 Criterion

Structure and Organization

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